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New Evidence on the Economic Progress of Foreign-Born Men in the 1970s and 1980s

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  • Robert F. Schoeni

Abstract

This study examines the economic progress of foreign-born men in the United States. Europeans entered the United States with relatively high wages and earned wages comparable to natives over their life course. Japanese, Korean, and Chinese men entered with lower wages but quickly caught up with U.S.-born workers. Mexicans and Central Americans entered with low wages, and the wage gap between themselves and U.S.-born workers has not shrunk. Disparities in completed years of education and whether education was received in the United States can explain a large share of the differences in the level of wages. For immigrants from some countries, it is found that more highly educated men assimilate more quickly. The rate of economic progress has not improved for more recent arrivals from any country, but this is most problematic among Mexicans and Central Americans because of their relatively low rates of wage growth.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 32 (1997)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 683-740

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:32:y:1997:i:4:p:683-740

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Mattoo, Aaditya & Neagu, Ileana Cristina & Özden, Çağlar, 2012. "Performance of skilled migrants in the U.S.: A dynamic approach," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 829-843.
  2. Duleep, Harriet & Regets, Mark, 2002. "The Elusive Concept of Immigrant Quality: Evidence from 1970-1990," IZA Discussion Papers 631, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Christian Dustmann & Albrecht Glitz, 2011. "Migration and Education," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1105, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  4. Basilio, Leilanie & Bauer, Thomas K., 2010. "Transferability of Human Capital and Immigrant Assimilation: An Analysis for Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 4716, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Sari Pekkala, 2005. "Economic Impacts of Immigration: A Survey," Discussion Papers 362, Government Institute for Economic Research Finland (VATT).
  6. Nguyen, Quynh C. & Hussey, Jon M. & Halpern, Carolyn T. & Villaveces, Andres & Marshall, Stephen W. & Siddiqi, Arjumand & Poole, Charles, 2012. "Adolescent expectations of early death predict young adult socioeconomic status," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(9), pages 1452-1460.
  7. Gonzalez, Arturo, 2003. "The education and wages of immigrant children: the impact of age at arrival," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 203-212, April.
  8. Yaqub, Shahin, 2010. "Does age-at-migration in childhood affect migrant socioeconomic achievements in adulthood?," MPRA Paper 27935, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Sónia Cabral & Cláudia Duarte, 2013. "Mind the gap! The relative wages of immigrants in the Portuguese labour market," Working Papers w201305, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
  10. Hirsch, Boris & Jahn, Elke J. & Toomet, Ott & Hochfellner, Daniela, 2013. "Does Better Pre-Migration Performance Accelerate Immigrants' Wage Assimilation?," IZA Discussion Papers 7240, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. George J. Borjas, 2013. "The Slowdown in the Economic Assimilation of Immigrants: Aging and Cohort Effects Revisited Again," NBER Working Papers 19116, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Serena Huang, 2011. "The international transferability of human capital in nursing," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 145-163, September.

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