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Marital Status and Earnings of Young Men: A Model with Endogenous Selection

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Author Info

  • Robert A. Nakosteen
  • Michael A. Zimmer

Abstract

It is a matter of course in applied labor economics to presume that marital status is a predetermined contributor to earnings among young males. We find no evidence to support that proposition. We estimate a model of earnings determination that permits endogenous selection of marital status. Our estimates are based on a sample of young employed males from the Michigan Panel Survey of Income Dynamics. They indicate that marital status, viewed in this manner, does not significantly shift the mean earnings profile. Our sensitivity tests indicate that this conclusion is robust with respect to a variety of alternative specifications.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 22 (1987)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 248-268

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:22:y:1987:i:2:p:248-268

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Esfandiar Maasoumi & Daniel L. Millimet & Dipanwita Sarkar, 2009. "Who Benefits from Marriage?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 71(1), pages 1-33, 02.
  2. Cornaglia, Francesca & Feldman, Naomi E., 2011. "Productivity, Wages, and Marriage: The Case of Major League Baseball," IZA Discussion Papers 5695, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Nottmeyer, Olga, 2010. "Does Intermarriage Pay Off? A Panel Data Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 5104, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Audrey Light, 2004. "Gender differences in the marriage and cohabitation income premium," Demography, Springer, vol. 41(2), pages 263-284, May.
  5. Nandi, Alita, 2008. "Women's economic gains from employment, marriage and cohabitation," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-23, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  6. Adam Thomas & Isabel Sawhill, 2002. "For richer or for poorer: Marriage as an antipoverty strategy," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(4), pages 587-599.
  7. Ronald Mincy & Jennifer Hill & Marilyn Sinkewicz, 2009. "Marriage: Cause or mere indicator of future earnings growth?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(3), pages 417-439.
  8. Bardasi, Elena & Taylor, Mark P., 2005. "Marriage and wages," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-01, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  9. Papps, Kerry L., 2006. "The Effects of Divorce Risk on the Labour Supply of Married Couples," IZA Discussion Papers 2395, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Åström, Johanna, 2009. "The Effects of Assortative Mating on Earnings: Human Capital Spillover or Specialization?," HUI Working Papers 34, HUI Research.
  11. Alois Stutzer & Bruno S. Frey, . "Does Marriage Make People Happy, Or Do Happy People Get Married?," IEW - Working Papers 143, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
  12. Maasoumi, Esfandiar & Millimet, Daniel & Sarkar, Dipanwita, 2005. "The Distribution of Returns to Marriage," Departmental Working Papers 0503, Southern Methodist University, Department of Economics.
  13. Chih Cheng CHEN, 2013. "Industry Agglomeration and Wage Differentiation: An Empirical Study on Taiwan’s Manufacturing Industry," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 13(2), pages 147-160.
  14. Anthony Stair, 2007. "Marital Wage Premium or Ability Selection? The Case of Taiwan 1979-2003," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 10(15), pages 1-11.
  15. Olga Nottmeyer, 2010. "Does Intermarriage Pay Off?: A Panel Data Analysis," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1044, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  16. Olga Nottmeyer, 2010. "Does Intermarriage Pay Off?: A Panel Data Analysis," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 314, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).

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