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Physicians' Services and the Division of Labor across Local Markets

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  • Baumgardner, James R
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    Abstract

    This paper reports empirical evidence of systematic cross-locale variation in the degree of division of labor among physicians. A theoretical model-based on an individual producer's trade-off between increasing returns and falling marginal revenue within each activity-motivates the empirical tests. At two levels of aggregation, specialization is correlated with local demand shifters for medical services. At the individual level, the author finds systematic differences in the range of procedures performed within a specialty class. General practitioners working fewer hours, practicing in more populated counties, or practicing in counties with more elderly produce a narrower range of procedures. Copyright 1988 by University of Chicago Press.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Political Economy.

    Volume (Year): 96 (1988)
    Issue (Month): 5 (October)
    Pages: 948-82

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:96:y:1988:i:5:p:948-82

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    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JPE/

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    Cited by:
    1. Hoyt Bleakley & Jeffrey Lin, 2007. "Thick-market effects and churning in the labor market: evidence from U.S. cities," Working Papers 07-23, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    2. Mark Doms & Ethan Lewis & Alicia Robb, 2010. "Local Labor Force Education, New Business Characteristics, and Firm Performance," NBER Chapters, in: Cities and Entrepreneurship National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Guido De Blasio, 2005. "Production Or Consumption? Disentangling The Skill-Agglomeration Connection," ERSA conference papers ersa05p648, European Regional Science Association.
    4. Duranton, Gilles & Jayet, Hubert, 2005. "Is the Division of Labour Limited By the Extent of the Market? Evidence from French Cities," CEPR Discussion Papers 5087, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Kristian Behrens & Frédéric Robert-Nicoud, 2008. "Survival of the fittest in cities: agglomeration, selection, and polarisation," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 28506, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Richard Walker, 2005. "Superstars and Renaissance Men: Specialization, Market Size and the Income Distribution," CEP Discussion Papers dp0707, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    7. Dora L. Costa & Matthew E. Kahn, 2000. "Power Couples: Changes In The Locational Choice Of The College Educated, 1940-1990," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1287-1315, November.
    8. Jonathan R. Clark & Robert S. Huckman & Bradley R. Staats, 2013. "Learning from Customers: Individual and Organizational Effects in Outsourced Radiological Services," NBER Working Papers 18723, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Suzanne Kok, 2012. "The division of labour across German cities and the extent of the market," ERSA conference papers ersa12p617, European Regional Science Association.
    10. Alberto Dalmazzo & Guido De Blasio, 2007. "Skill-Biased Agglomeration Effects and Amenities: Theory with an Application to Italian Cities," Department of Economics University of Siena 503, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    11. Gächter, Martin & Schwazer, Peter & Theurl, Engelbert & Winner, Hannes, 2012. "Physician density in a two-tiered health care system," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 106(3), pages 257-268.
    12. Suzanne Kok, 2013. "Town and city jobs: Your job is different in another location," CPB Discussion Paper 246, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    13. Richard Walker, 2005. "Superstars and renaissance men: specialization, market size and the income distribution," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19880, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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