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Mr. Cummings's Strictures on "The Theory of the Leisure Class"

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  • Thorstein Veblen
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    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal The Journal of Political Economy.

    Volume (Year): 8 (1899)
    Issue (Month): ()
    Pages: 106

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:8:y:1899:p:106

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    Cited by:
    1. Stefano Bartolini & Ennio Bilancini & Francesco Sarracino, 2011. "Predicting the Trend of Well-Being in Germany: How Much Do Comparisons, Adaptation and Sociability Matter?," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 414, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Ilyana Kuziemko & Ryan W. Buell & Taly Reich & Michael I. Norton, 2011. ""Last-place Aversion": Evidence and Redistributive Implications," NBER Working Papers 17234, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Bartelmus, Peter, 1999. "Economic growth and patterns of sustainability," Wuppertal Papers 98, Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy.
    4. Luca Fiorito & Massimiliano Vatiero, 2011. "La posizionalità come presupposto della relazionalità; e viceversa," Department of Economics University of Siena 610, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    5. Marjit, Sugata & Roychowdhury, Punarjit, 2011. "Status, Poverty and Trade," MPRA Paper 33730, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Bruno Dallago & Chiara Guglielmetti, 2011. "The Eurozone Crisis: Institutional Setting, Structural Vulnerability, and Policies," Openloc Working Papers 1112, Public policies and local development.
    7. Leonardo Becchetti & Riccardo Massari & Paolo Naticchioni, 2011. "The drivers of happiness inequality: Suggestions for promoting social cohesion," Working Papers 2011-06, Universita' di Cassino, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche.
    8. Felix R. FitzRoy & Michael A. Nolan & Max F. Steinhardt & David Ulph, 2011. "So Far so Good: Age, Happiness, and Relative Income," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 415, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    9. Temesgen Kifle, 2014. "Do Comparison Wages Play a Major Role in Determining Overall Job Satisfaction? Evidence from Australia," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 613-638, June.
    10. Ennio Bilancini & Simone D'Alessandro, 2011. "Long-run Welfare under Externalities in Consumption, Leisure, and Production: A Case for Happy Degrowth vs. Unhappy Growth," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 072, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics.
    11. Stefano Bartolini & Francesco Sarracino, 2011. "Happy for How Long? How Social Capital and GDP relate to Happiness over Time," Department of Economics University of Siena 621, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    12. Bruno S. Frey & Alois Stutzer, 2010. "Happiness: A New Approach in Economics," CESifo DICE Report, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 8(4), pages 3-7, 01.
    13. Christian Ghiglino & Sanjeev Goyal, 2010. "Keeping Up with the Neighbors: Social Interaction in a Market Economy," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 8(1), pages 90-119, 03.
    14. Gabriel Fagan & Vito Gaspar & Peter McAdam, 2014. "Kant’s Endogenous Growth Mechanism," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0214, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    15. Kristin Kronenberg & Tobias Kronenberg, 2011. "Keeping up with the Joneses by finding a better-paid job - The effect of relative income on job mobility," ERSA conference papers ersa11p1445, European Regional Science Association.
    16. Marco Guerzoni & Massimiliano Nuccio, 2014. "Music consumption at the dawn of the music industry: the rise of a cultural fad," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 38(2), pages 145-171, May.

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