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Child Quality and the Demand for Children

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  • De Tray, Dennis N
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Political Economy.

    Volume (Year): 81 (1973)
    Issue (Month): 2 (Part II, March-April)
    Pages: S70-95

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:81:y:1973:i:2:p:s70-95

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    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JPE/

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    Cited by:
    1. Psacharopoulos, George & Tzannatos, Zafiris, 1992. "Latin American women's earnings and participation in the labor force," Policy Research Working Paper Series 856, The World Bank.
    2. Massimiliano BRATTI, 2001. "Labour Force Participation and Marital Fertility of Italian Women: The Role of Education," Working Papers 154, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    3. Magali Recoules, 2011. "How can gender discrimination explain fertility behaviors and family-friendly policies?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 505-521, December.
    4. Michael Hout, 1978. "The determinants of marital fertility in the united states, 1968–1970: Inferences from a dynamic model," Demography, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 139-159, May.
    5. Michael Grossman, 2005. "Education and Nonmarket Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 11582, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "A Theory of Social Interactions," NBER Working Papers 0042, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Jaime Vallés Giménez & Anabel Zárate Marco, . "Influyen las ayudas públicas por descendientes la fecundidad?. Un estudio para España por tramos de edad," Studies on the Spanish Economy 148, FEDEA.
    8. Khanam, Rasheda, 2006. "Child labour and school attendance: evidence from Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 6990, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2007.
    9. Daniel A. Seiver & Donald J. Cymrot, 1984. "A New Approach to Household Fertility Behavior," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 31-41, Jan-Mar.
    10. Tadashi Yamada & Tetsuji Yamada, 1984. "Estimation of a Simultaneous Model of Married Women's Labor Force Participation and Fertility in Urban Japan," NBER Working Papers 1362, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Larry E. Jones & Michele Tertilt, 2006. "An Economic History of Fertility in the U.S.: 1826-1960," NBER Working Papers 12796, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Cristina Echevarria & Karine Moe, 2000. "On the Need for Gender in Dynamic Models," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(2), pages 77-96.
    13. Magali Recoules, 2011. "How can gender discrimination explain fertility behaviors and family-friendly policies?," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00675601, HAL.
    14. Shoshana Grossbard-Shechtman, 2001. "The New Home Economics at Colombia and Chicago," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(3), pages 103-130.
    15. James Cramer, 1979. "Employment trends ofyoung mothers and the opportunity cost of babies in the United States," Demography, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 177-197, May.
    16. Barro, Robert J. & Lee, Jong-Wha, 1993. "International comparisons of educational attainment," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 363-394, December.
    17. Anderson, Gordon & Leo, Teng Wah, 2013. "An empirical examination of matching theories: The one child policy, partner choice and matching intensity in urban China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 468-489.

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