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The Fear and Exuberance from Implied Volatility of S&P 100 Index Options

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  • Cheekiat Low

    (National University of Singapore)

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    Abstract

    I study the relation between option traders' risk perception and contemporaneous market conditions. Risk perception tends to increase when downside volatility increases more than upside volatility. The risk-return relation is asymmetric and nonlinear, best described as a downward-sloping reclined S-curve. That prior gains appear to have some mitigating effect on the fear of loss relative to prior losses points to a "house money" effect. Broader market conditions influence the perception of risk in a manner consistent with the "keeping up with the Joneses" effect. Leverage is a weak explanation for the risk-return relation.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Business.

    Volume (Year): 77 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 3 (July)
    Pages: 527-546

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jnlbus:v:77:y:2004:i:3:p:527-546

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    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JB/

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    Cited by:
    1. D.E. Allen & Abhay K Singh & R. Powell & Michael McAleer & James Taylor & Lyn Thomas, 2012. "The Volatility-Return Relationship: Insights from Linear and Non-Linear Quantile Regressions," Documentos de Trabajo del ICAE 2012-24, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Instituto Complutense de Análisis Económico.
    2. David E. Allen & Abhay K. Singh & Robert J. Powell & Michael McAleer & James Taylor & Lyn Thomas, 2013. "Return-Volatility Relationship: Insights from Linear and Non-Linear Quantile Regression," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-020/III, Tinbergen Institute.
    3. Birru, Justin & Figlewski, Stephen, 2012. "Anatomy of a meltdown: The risk neutral density for the S&P 500 in the fall of 2008," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 151-180.
    4. David E. Allen & Abhay K. Singh & Robert J. Powell & Michael McAleer & James Taylor & Lyn Thomas, 2013. "Return-Volatility Relationship: Insights from Linear and Non-Linear Quantile Regression," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-020/III, Tinbergen Institute.
    5. Ederington, Louis H. & Guan, Wei, 2010. "How asymmetric is U.S. stock market volatility?," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 225-248, May.
    6. Hibbert, Ann Marie & Daigler, Robert T. & Dupoyet, Brice, 2008. "A behavioral explanation for the negative asymmetric return-volatility relation," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(10), pages 2254-2266, October.

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