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Environment, Technology, and the Social Articulation of Risk in West African Agriculture

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  • Carter, Michael R

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Economic Development and Cultural Change.

Volume (Year): 45 (1997)
Issue (Month): 3 (April)
Pages: 557-90

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:v:45:y:1997:i:3:p:557-90

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/EDCC/

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Cited by:
  1. Mogues, Tewodaj, 2006. "Shocks, livestock asset dynamics and social capital in Ethiopia:," DSGD discussion papers 38, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Carter, Michael R. & Maluccio, John A., 2002. "Social capital and coping with economic shocks," FCND discussion papers 142, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Nugent, Jeffrey B. & Sanchez, Nicholas, 1999. "The local variability of rainfall and tribal institutions: the case of Sudan," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 263-291, July.
  4. Marcel Fafchamps & Chris Udry & Katherine Czukas, . "Drought and Saving in West Africa: Are Livestock a Buffer Stock?," Working Papers 97013, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
  5. Rizov, Marian & Gavrilescu, Dinu & Gow, Hamish & Mathijs, Erik & Swinnen, Johan F. M., 2001. "Transition and Enterprise Restructuring: The Development of Individual Farming in Romania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(7), pages 1257-1274, July.
  6. Sarris, Alexander, 2002. "The demand for commodity insurance by developing country agricultural producers - theory and an application to cocoa in Ghana," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2887, The World Bank.
  7. Wiggins, Steve, 2000. "Interpreting Changes from the 1970s to the 1990s in African Agriculture Through Village Studies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 631-662, April.
  8. Zimmerman, Frederick J. & Carter, Michael R., 2003. "Asset smoothing, consumption smoothing and the reproduction of inequality under risk and subsistence constraints," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 233-260, August.
  9. Carter, Michael R. & Lybbert, Travis J., 2012. "Consumption versus asset smoothing: testing the implications of poverty trap theory in Burkina Faso," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 255-264.
  10. Carter, Michael R. & Maluccio, John A., 2003. "Social Capital and Coping with Economic Shocks: An Analysis of Stunting of South African Children," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 1147-1163, July.
  11. Cornilius Chikawama, 2004. "Quota Rural Off-Farm Employment and Farm Investment: An Analytical Framework and Evidence from Zimbabwe," Working Papers E04, Department of Economics, School of Management and Languages, Heriot Watt University.
  12. Rapsomanikis, George & Sarris, Alexander, 2006. "The Impact of Domestic and International Commodity Price Volatility on Agricultural Income Instability: Ghana, Vietnam and Peru," Working Paper Series DP2006/04, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  13. Christiaensen, Luc J. & Boisvert, Richard N. & Hoddinott, John, 2000. "Validating operational food insecurity indicators against a dynamic benchmark : evidence from Mali," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2471, The World Bank.
  14. Ambrosius, Christian & Cuecuecha, Alfredo, 2013. "Are Remittances a Substitute for Credit? Carrying the Financial Burden of Health Shocks in National and Transnational Households," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 143-152.
  15. G√ľnther, Isabel & Harttgen, Kenneth, 2009. "Estimating Households Vulnerability to Idiosyncratic and Covariate Shocks: A Novel Method Applied in Madagascar," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(7), pages 1222-1234, July.
  16. Abdulai, Awudu & CroleRees, Anna, 2001. "Determinants of income diversification amongst rural households in Southern Mali," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 437-452, August.
  17. Anderson, Jock R., 2003. "Risk in rural development: challenges for managers and policy makers," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 75(2-3), pages 161-197.

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