Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

What evidence should social policymakers use?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Andrew Leigh

    (Treasury, Government of Australia)

Abstract

Policymakers seeking empirical evidence on social policy interventions often find themselves confronted with a mountain of academic studies that are potentially relevant to the question. Without some systematic way to sort through the evidence, there is a risk that analysts will become mired in the research, or simply cherry-pick those studies that support their prior beliefs. An alternative approach is to test each study against a hierarchy of research methods. This article discusses two hierarchies — one used by US medical researchers, and another used by UK social policymakers — and suggests one possible hierarchy for Australia. Naturally, such a hierarchy should not be the only tool used to assess research, and should be used in conjunction with other factors, such as the ranking of the journal in which a study is published. But used carefully, a hierarchy can help policymakers sort through a daunting body of research, and may also inform governments’ decisions on how to evaluate social policy interventions.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.treasury.gov.au/PublicationsAndMedia/Publications/2009/Economic-Roundup-Issue-1
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Treasury, Australian Government in its journal Economic Roundup.

Volume (Year): (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 27-43

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:tsy:journl:journl_tsy_er_2009_1_3

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Langton Crescent, PARKES ACT 2600
Phone: +61 2 6263 2111
Fax: +61 2 6273 2614
Email:
Web page: http://www.treasury.gov.au
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: policy-making; social welfare;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Klemen Sirok & Gregor Petric, 2011. "Impact measurement revised: Evaluating the Impact of the Lifelong Learning Programme in Slovenia," MIC 2011: Managing Sustainability? Proceedings of the 12th International Conference, Portorož, 23–26 November 2011 [Selected Papers], University of Primorska, Faculty of Management Koper.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:tsy:journl:journl_tsy_er_2009_1_3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Department of Treasury).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.