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Do Older Investors Make Better Investment Decisions?

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  • George M Korniotis

    (School of Business Administration, University of Miami)

  • Alok Kumar

    (School of Business Administration, University of Miami, and University of Texas at Austin)

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    Abstract

    This paper examines the investment decisions of older individual investors. We find that older and experienced investors are more likely to follow rules of thumb that reflect greater investment knowledge. However, older investors are less effective in applying their investment knowledge and exhibit worse investment skill, especially if they are less educated, earn lower income, and belong to minority racial/ethnic groups. Overall, the adverse effects of aging dominate the positive effects of experience. These results indicate that older investors' portfolio decisions reflect greater knowledge about investing, but investment skill deteriorates with age due to the adverse effects of cognitive aging. © 2011 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by MIT Press in its journal The Review of Economics and Statistics.

    Volume (Year): 93 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 1 (February)
    Pages: 244-265

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    Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:93:y:2011:i:1:p:244-265

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    Cited by:
    1. Waelchli, Urs & Zeller, Jonas, 2013. "Old captains at the helm: Chairman age and firm performance," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 1612-1628.
    2. Lukas Menkhoff & Maik Schmeling & Ulrich Schmidt, 2010. "Overconfidence, Experience, and Professionalism: An Experimental Study," Kiel Working Papers 1612, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
    3. Barber, Brad M. & Lee, Yi-Tsung & Liu, Yu-Jane & Odean, Terrance, 2014. "The cross-section of speculator skill: Evidence from day trading," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 1-24.
    4. Stotz, Olaf & Georgi, Dominik, 2012. "A logit model of retail investors' individual trading decisions and their relations to insider trades," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 159-167.
    5. Cheng, Teng Yuan & Lee, Chun I & Lin, Chao Hsien, 2013. "An examination of the relationship between the disposition effect and gender, age, the traded security, and bull–bear market conditions," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 195-213.
    6. Joanne W. Hsu, 2011. "Aging and Strategic Learning: The Impact of Spousal Incentives on Financial Literacy," NFI Working Papers 2011-WP-06, Indiana State University, Scott College of Business, Networks Financial Institute.
    7. Hoechle, Daniel & Schmid, Markus & Zimmermann, Heinz, 2012. "Measuring Long-term Performance: a Regression Based Generalization of the Calendar Time Portfolio Approach," Working Papers on Finance 1216, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance.
    8. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2013. "The Economic Importance of Financial Literacy: Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 18952, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Erdem, Orhan & Yüksel, Serkan & Arık, Evren, 2013. "Trading Puzzle, Puzzling Trade," MPRA Paper 46804, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 21 Feb 2013.
    10. Hoffmann, Arvid O.I. & Post, Thomas & Pennings, Joost M.E., 2013. "Individual investor perceptions and behavior during the financial crisis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 60-74.
    11. Campbell, John Y & Ramadorai, Tarun & Ranish, Benjamin, 2014. "Getting Better or Feeling Better? How Equity Investors Respond to Investment Experience," CEPR Discussion Papers 9907, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Bailey, Warren & Kumar, Alok & Ng, David, 2011. "Behavioral biases of mutual fund investors," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(1), pages 1-27, October.
    13. Marco Angrisani & Michael D. Hurd & Erik Meijer, 2012. "Investment Decisions in Retirement: The Role of Subjective Expectations," Working Papers wp274, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    14. Nofsinger, John R., 2012. "Household behavior and boom/bust cycles," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 161-173.

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