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Long-Run Health Impacts of Income Shocks: Wine and Phylloxera in Nineteenth-Century France

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  • Abhijit Banerjee

    (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

  • Esther Duflo

    (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

  • Gilles Postel-Vinay

    (INRA and EHESS)

  • Tim Watts

    (NERA)

Abstract

Between 1863 and 1890, phylloxera destroyed 40% of French vineyards. Using the regional variation in the timing of this shock, we identify and examine the effects on adult height, health, and life expectancy of children born in the years and regions affected by the phylloxera. The shock decreased long-run height, but it did not affect other dimensions of health, including life expectancy. We find that those born in affected regions were about 1.8 millimeters shorter than others at age 20, a significant effect since average heights grew by only 2 centimeters in the entire nineteenth century. (c) 2010 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal The Review of Economics and Statistics.

Volume (Year): 92 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 714-728

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:92:y:2010:i:4:p:714-728

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Cited by:
  1. Martine Mariotti, 2012. "Living Standards In South Africa's Former Homelands," CEH Discussion Papers, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University 003, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  2. Burlando, Alfredo, 2014. "Transitory shocks and birth weights: Evidence from a blackout in Zanzibar," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 154-168.
  3. Sonia Bhalotra & Atheendar Venkataramani, 2011. "The Captain of the Men of Death and His Shadow: Long-Run Impacts of Early Life Pneumonia Exposure," CHILD Working Papers, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY wp20_11, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
  4. Martine Mariotti, 2012. "Father’s employment and sons’ stature: the long run effects of a positive regional employment shock in South Africa’s mining industry," Working Papers 02/2012, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
  5. Emla Fitzsimons & Bansi Malde & Alice Mesnard & Marcos Vera-Hernandez, 2014. "Nutrition, information, and household behaviour: experimental evidence from Malawi," IFS Working Papers, Institute for Fiscal Studies W14/02, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  6. Sotomayor, Orlando, 2013. "Fetal and infant origins of diabetes and ill health: Evidence from Puerto Rico's 1928 and 1932 hurricanes," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 281-293.
  7. Carlson, Kyle, 2014. "Fear itself: The effects of distressing economic news on birth outcomes," MPRA Paper 56560, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Felfe, Christina & Deuchert. Eva, 2011. "The tempest: Using a natural disaster to evaluate the link between wealth and child development," Economics Working Paper Series, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science 1146, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
  9. Eva Deuchert & Christina Felfe, 2013. "The Tempest: Natural Disasters, Early Shocks and Children's Short- and Long-Run Development," CESifo Working Paper Series, CESifo Group Munich 4168, CESifo Group Munich.
  10. Shoji, Masahiro & Aoyagi, Keitaro & Kasahara, Ryuji & Sawada, Yasuyuki & Ueyama, Mika, 2012. "Social Capital Formation and Credit Access: Evidence from Sri Lanka," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 40(12), pages 2522-2536.
  11. Joseph P. Ferrie & Karen Rolf, 2011. "Socioeconomic Status in Childhood and Health After Age 70: A New Longitudinal Analysis for the U.S., 1895-2005," NBER Working Papers 17016, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Venkataramani, Atheendar S., 2012. "Early life exposure to malaria and cognition in adulthood: Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 767-780.
  13. Johnson, Eric & Reynolds, C. Lockwood, 2013. "The effect of household hospitalizations on the educational attainment of youth," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 165-182.
  14. Vogl, Tom S., 2014. "Height, skills, and labor market outcomes in Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 84-96.

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