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Economic Determinants of Land Invasions

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  • F. Daniel Hidalgo

    (University of California, Berkeley)

  • Suresh Naidu

    (Columbia University)

  • Simeon Nichter

    (Stanford University)

  • Neal Richardson

    (University of California, Berkeley)

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    Abstract

    This study estimates the effect of economic conditions on redistributive conflict. We examine land invasions in Brazil using a panel data set with over 50,000 municipality-year observations. Adverse economic shocks, instrumented by rainfall, cause the rural poor to invade and occupy large landholdings. This effect exhibits substantial heterogeneity by land inequality and land tenure systems, but not by other observable variables. In highly unequal municipalities, negative income shocks cause twice as many land invasions as in municipalities with average land inequality. Cross-sectional estimates using fine within-region variation also suggest the importance of land inequality in explaining redistributive conflict. © 2010 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by MIT Press in its journal The Review of Economics and Statistics.

    Volume (Year): 92 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 3 (August)
    Pages: 505-523

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    Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:92:y:2010:i:3:p:505-523

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    Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/

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    Web: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journal-home.tcl?issn=00346535

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    Cited by:
    1. Fabio Clementi & Francesco Schettino, 2013. "Income polarization in Brazil, 2001-2011: A distributional analysis using PNAD data," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 1796-1815.
    2. Solomon Hsiang & Marshall Burke, 2014. "Climate, conflict, and social stability: what does the evidence say?," Climatic Change, Springer, Springer, vol. 123(1), pages 39-55, March.
    3. Dominic Rohner, 2008. "Reputation, Group Structure and Social Tensions," HiCN Working Papers, Households in Conflict Network 40, Households in Conflict Network.
    4. Jordi Domènech Feliu, 2013. "Land tenure inequality, harvests, and rural conflict ; evidence from Southern Spain in the 1930s," Working Papers in Economic History, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Historia Económica e Instituciones wp13-06, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Historia Económica e Instituciones.
    5. Ole Theisen & Nils Gleditsch & Halvard Buhaug, 2013. "Is climate change a driver of armed conflict?," Climatic Change, Springer, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 613-625, April.
    6. Brueckner, Jan K., 2013. "Urban squatting with rent-seeking organizers," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 561-569.
    7. Melissa Dell & Benjamin F. Jones & Benjamin A. Olken, 2013. "What Do We Learn from the Weather? The New Climate-Economy Literature," NBER Working Papers 19578, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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