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Institutions and Financial Development: Evidence from International Migrants in the United States

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Author Info

  • Una Okonkwo Osili

    (Indiana University at Purdue University, Indianapolis)

  • Anna L. Paulson

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago)

Abstract

We investigate the impact of institutions on financial development by analyzing the financial behavior of immigrants in the United States. We find that immigrants from countries with institutions that more effectively protect private property are more likely to own stock in the United States. The effect of home-country institutions is persistent and absorbed early in life. The impact of institutions is amplified for immigrants who live in metropolitan areas with many other immigrants from the same country. These findings are robust to alternative measures of institutional effectiveness and to various methods of controlling for unobserved individual characteristics, including specifications with country fixed effects. Copyright by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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File URL: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1162/rest.90.3.498
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal The Review of Economics and Statistics.

Volume (Year): 90 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3 (August)
Pages: 498-517

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:90:y:2008:i:3:p:498-517

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Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/

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Cited by:
  1. Una Okonkwo Osili & Anna Paulson, 2009. "Bank Crises and Investor Confidence," Working Papers 09-02, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  2. Anneke Kosse & David-Jan Jansen, 2011. "Choosing how to pay: the influence of home country habits," DNB Working Papers 328, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  3. Giorgio Albareto & Paolo Mistrulli, 2011. "Bridging the gap between migrants and the banking system," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 794, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  4. Ulrike Malmendier & Stefan Nagel, 2011. "Depression Babies: Do Macroeconomic Experiences Affect Risk Taking?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(1), pages 373-416.
  5. Duanmu, Jing-Lin & Guney, Yilmaz, 2013. "Heterogeneous effect of ethnic networks on international trade of Thailand: The role of family ties and ethnic diversity," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 126-139.
  6. Bönte, Werner & Filipiak, Ute, 2012. "Financial literacy, information flows, and caste affiliation: Empirical evidence from India," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(12), pages 3399-3414.
  7. Michael Berlemann & Marc-André Luik, 2014. "Institutional Reform and Depositors' Portfolio Choice - Evidence from Censored Quantile Regressions," CESifo Working Paper Series 4782, CESifo Group Munich.

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