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Does Informal Eldercare Impede Women's Employment? The Case of European Welfare States

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  • Andreas Kotsadam

Abstract

European states vary in eldercare policies and in gendered norms of family care, and this study uses these variations to gain insight into the importance of macro-level factors for the work-care relationship. Using advanced panel data methods on European Community Household Panel (ECHP) data for 1994-2001, this study finds women's employment to be negatively associated with informal caregiving to the elderly across the European Union. For the countries included in the study, the effects of informal caregiving seem to be more negative in Southern Europe, less negative in Nordic countries, and in between these extremes in Central Europe. This study explains that since eldercare is a choice in countries with more formal care and less pronounced gendered care norms, the weaker impact of eldercare on women's employment in these countries has to do with the lesser degree of coercion in the caring decision.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13545701.2010.543384
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Feminist Economics.

Volume (Year): 17 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 121-144

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Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:17:y:2011:i:2:p:121-144

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Related research

Keywords: Informal care; female labor supply; European welfare states;

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Cited by:
  1. Andreas Kotsadam, 2012. "The employment costs of caregiving in Norway," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 269-283, December.
  2. Elenka Brenna & Cinzia Di Novi, 2013. "Is caring for elderly parents detrimental to women’s mental health? The influence of the European North-South gradient," DISCE - Working Papers del Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza def4, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
  3. Thomas Hansen & Britt Slagsvold & Reidun Ingebretsen, 2013. "The Strains and Gains of Caregiving: An Examination of the Effects of Providing Personal Care to a Parent on a Range of Indicators of Psychological Well-Being," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 114(2), pages 323-343, November.

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