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Cultural Factors in Women's Labor Force Participation in Chile

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  • Dante Contreras
  • Gonzalo Plaza

Abstract

This article analyzes determinants of female participation in the Chilean labor force using classic determinants such as age, education, marital status, and number of children. The results indicate that the greater a woman's education level, the greater her labor participation; that older women participate more, though the rate of growth of this effect is decreasing; and the number of children that a woman has is negatively correlated to her decision to participate in the labor force. The article also examines machismo and other cultural values that influence female labor participation. The evidence suggests that the more the women have internalized machista and conservative cultural values, the less they participate in the labor market. Finally, the article concludes that the existence of these cultural factors as a group more than compensates for the positive effect of human capital variables and is statistically associated with low female labor participation in Chile.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Feminist Economics.

Volume (Year): 16 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 27-46

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Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:16:y:2010:i:2:p:27-46

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Related research

Keywords: Female labor force participation rate; social norms; culture; machismo;

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Cited by:
  1. David Bravo & Esteban Puentes, 2012. "Female Labor Force Participation and Informal Care of Adults: Evidence for a middle-income country," Working Papers wp353, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
  2. Pastore, Francesco & Tenaglia, Simona, 2013. "Ora et non Labora? A Test of the Impact of Religion on Female Labor Supply," IZA Discussion Papers 7356, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. World Bank, 2011. "Work and Family : Latin American and Caribbean Women in Search of a New Balance," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12489, The World Bank.
  4. Dante Contreras & Esteban Puentes & David Bravo, 2012. "Female Labor Supply and Child Care Supply in Chile," Working Papers wp370, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
  5. Dante Contreras & Agustin Hurtado & M. Francisca Sara, 2012. "La Excepción Chilena y las Percepciones de Género en la Participación Laboral Femenina," Working Papers wp374, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
  6. Tilman Brück & Damir Esenaliev & Antje Kroeger & Alma Kudebayeva & Bakhrom Mirkasimov & Susan Steiner, 2012. "Household Survey Data for Research on Well-Being and Behavior in Central Asia," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1257, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

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