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Household Surveys, Consumption, and the Measurement of Poverty

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  • Angus Deaton

Abstract

Household surveys are playing an increasingly important role in the measurement of poverty and well-being around the world. The Living Standards Measurement Study, which was begun in the World Bank under the guidance of Graham Pyatt in 1979, has played an important role in this movement. Its surveys are widely used within the Bank to measure consumption-based poverty, and survey data are now the exclusive basis for the global poverty counts. This paper discusses a number of unresolved issues in using consumption-based surveys for measuring well-being, including the choice of a money-metric versus welfare-ratio approach, the collection of suitable price information, the effects of measurement error on estimation, and methods for correcting per capita consumption for the demographic structure of the household.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Economic Systems Research.

Volume (Year): 15 (2003)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 135-159

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Handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:15:y:2003:i:2:p:135-159

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Keywords: Household Surveys; Consumption; Poverty;

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Cited by:
  1. David Stifel & Luc Christiaensen, 2007. "Tracking Poverty Over Time in the Absence of Comparable Consumption Data," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 21(2), pages 317-341, June.
  2. Miriam Hortas-Rico & Jorge Onrubia & Daniele Pacifico, 2010. "Estimating the Personal Income Distribution in Spanish Municipalities Using Tax Micro-Data," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1419, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  3. Sundar, B. & Virmani, Vineet, . "Attitudes towards Risk of Forest Dependent Communities - Evidence from Andhra Pradesh," IIMA Working Papers WP2013-12-01, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Research and Publication Department.
  4. Dhongde, Shatakshee & Minoiu, Camelia, 2013. "Global Poverty Estimates: A Sensitivity Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 1-13.
  5. Sundar, B. & Virmani, Vineet, . "“Impatience” of Forest Dependent Communities - Evidence from Andhra Pradesh," IIMA Working Papers WP2013-12-02, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Research and Publication Department.

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