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The socioeconomic consequences of young women's childbearing: Reconciling disparate evidence

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  • David C. Ribar

    ()
    (Department of Economics, The George Washington University, Funger Hall, 2201 G Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA)

Abstract

Recent studies have begun to examine rigorously the links between early childbearing and subsequent socioeconomic status. Prominent in this literature has been a set of analyses that have used sibling fixed effects models to control for omitted variables bias. These studies report that the siblings difference procedure leads to smaller estimates of the effects of teen fertility than does standard regression analysis. While it is well known that the siblings fixed effects procedure makes strong assumptions regarding the type of omitted variables and is not necessarily robust to alternative assumptions, the assumptions of the procedure have not been explicitly examined. This paper uses 1979-1992 data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to compare estimates of the income and education consequences of teenage and young adult fertility from standard regression and siblings fixed effects models with estimates from more general, alternative siblings models.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Population Economics.

Volume (Year): 12 (1999)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 547-565

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Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:12:y:1999:i:4:p:547-565

Note: Received: 19 January 1998/Accepted: 6 April 1999
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Related research

Keywords: Fertility · siblings models;

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Cited by:
  1. Ian Walker & Yu Zhu, 2009. "The Causal Effect of Teen Motherhood on Worklessness," Studies in Economics 0917, Department of Economics, University of Kent.
  2. Guyonne Kalb & Trinh Le & Felix Leung, 2014. "Outcomes for Teenage Mothers in the First Years after Birth," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2014n06, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  3. repec:dgr:uvatin:2007024 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Joseph Sabia & Daniel Rees, 2012. "Does the number of sex partners affect educational attainment? Evidence from female respondents to the Add Health," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 89-118, January.
  5. Parfait M. Eloundou-Enyegue & C. Shannon Stokes, 2004. "Teen Fertility and Gender Inequality in Education," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 11(11), pages 305-334, December.
  6. Jason M. Fletcher & Barbara L. Wolfe, 2008. "Education and Labor Market Consequences of Teenage Childbearing: Evidence Using the Timing of Pregnancy Outcomes and Community Fixed Effects," CEPR Discussion Papers 573, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  7. Ermisch, John & Pevalin, David J., 2004. "Early childbearing and housing choices," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 170-194, September.
  8. Kevin Stange, 2011. "A Longitudinal Analysis of the Relationship Between Fertility Timing and Schooling," Demography, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 931-956, August.
  9. Holmlund, Helena, 2004. "Estimating Long-Term Consequences of Teenage Childbearing - An Examination of the Siblings Approach," Working Paper Series 1/2004, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
  10. Daniel Klepinger & Shelly Lundberg & Robert Plotnick, 1999. "How Does Adolescent Fertility Affect the Human Capital and Wages of Young Women?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(3), pages 421-448.
  11. Jason Fletcher, 2012. "The effects of teenage childbearing on the short- and long-term health behaviors of mothers," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 201-218, January.
  12. Grant Miller, 2005. "Contraception as Development? New Evidence from Family Planning in Colombia," NBER Working Papers 11704, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Anna de Paoli, 2011. "Education, Teenage Fertility and Labour Market Participation, Evidence from Ecuador," Development Working Papers 319, Centro Studi Luca d\'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 17 Oct 2011.
  14. Rachel Connelly & Deborah DeGraff & Deborah Levison & Brian McCall, 2006. "Tackling The Endogeneity Of Fertility In The Study Of Women'S Employment In Developing Countries: Alternative Estimation Strategies Using Data From Urban Brazil," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 561-597.

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