Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Reinterpreting the performance of immigrant wages from panel data

Contents:

Author Info

  • Derek Hum
  • Wayne Simpson

    ()

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Immigrants differ from the native born in terms of unobserved factors, such as motivation, and observed factors, including those related to the interruption of labour market activity and earning capacity, which may bias estimates of immigrant integration. Using panel data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we show that using potential experience, rather than actual experience, exaggerates estimates of the disruption and recovery caused by immigration. More importantly, we find support for omitted variables bias, arising from unobserved fixed effects. Instrumental variable estimates for both pooled and separate samples of immigrant and native born men demonstrate a wage disadvantage for immigrants upon entry that persists through their lifetime. Standard estimates of a modest wage advantage for the children of immigrants also suffer from omitted variables bias arising from unobservables. Contrary to most of the literature to date, our instrumental variable estimates which allow for unobservable fixed effects suggest that immigrants never catch up to otherwise comparable native born workers, but their children do just as well. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2004

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00181-003-0193-1
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Empirical Economics.

    Volume (Year): 29 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 129-147

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:29:y:2004:i:1:p:129-147

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: Stumpergasse 56, A-1060 Vienna
    Phone: ++43 - (0)1 - 599 91 - 0
    Fax: ++43 - (0)1 - 599 91 - 555
    Web page: http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00181/index.htm
    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information:
    Web: http://link.springer.de/orders.htm

    Related research

    Keywords: Immigration; wages; panel data; J40; C23; F22;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Casey Warman, 2007. "You Can Take it with You! The Returns to Foreign Human Capital of Male Temporary Foreign Workers," Working Papers 1125, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    2. Sweetman, Arthur & Warman, Casey, 2009. "Temporary Foreign Workers and Former International Students as a Source of Permanent Immigration," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2009-34, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 22 Jun 2009.
    3. Mari Kangasniemi & Merja Kauhanen, 2013. "Who leaves and who stays? Outmigration of Estonian immigrants from Finland and its impact on economic assimilation of Estonian immigrants in Finland," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2013001, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
    4. Abdurrahman Aydemir & Wen-Hao Chen & Miles Corak, 2005. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility Among the Children of Canadian Immigrants," Labor and Demography 0511006, EconWPA.
    5. Garnett Picot & Patrizio Piraino, 2013. "Immigrant earnings growth: selection bias or real progress?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 46(4), pages 1510-1536, November.
    6. Goldmann, Gustave & Sweetman, Arthur & Warman, Casey, 2009. "The Economic Return on New Immigrants' Human Capital: the Impact of Occupational Matching," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2009-30, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 22 Apr 2009.
    7. Cristina Fernández & Ana Carolina Ortega Masagué, 2006. "Labor Market Assimilation of Immigrants in Spain: Employment at the Expense of Bad Job-Matches?," Working Papers 2006-21, FEDEA.
    8. de Walque, Damien, 2008. "Race, immigration, and the U.S. labor marke t: contrasting the outcomes of foreign born and native blacks," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4737, The World Bank.
    9. Skuterud, Mikal & Su, Mingcui, 2009. "Immigrant Wage Assimilation and the Return to Foreign and Host-Country Sources of Human Capital," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2009-38, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 26 Jun 2009.
    10. Mikal Skuterud & Mingcui Su, 2012. "The influence of measurement error and unobserved heterogeneity in estimating immigrant returns to foreign and host-country sources of human capital," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 1109-1141, December.
    11. Michael Beenstock & Barry Chiswick & Ari Paltiel, 2010. "Testing the immigrant assimilation hypothesis with longitudinal data," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 7-27, March.
    12. Juan J. Dolado & Pablo Vázquez & Varios Autores, 2008. "Ensayos sobre los efectos económicos de la inmigración en España," Economic Reports 01-08, FEDEA.
    13. Mosfequs Salehin & Robert Breunig, 2012. "The immigrant wage gap and assimilation in Australia: the impact of unobserved heterogeneity," CEPR Discussion Papers 661, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    14. Beenstock, Michael & Chiswick, Barry R. & Paltiel, Ari, 2005. "Endogenous Assimilation and Immigrant Adjustment in Longitudinal Data," IZA Discussion Papers 1840, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:29:y:2004:i:1:p:129-147. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Guenther Eichhorn) or (Christopher F Baum).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.