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Cash Use in Australia: New Survey Evidence

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  • John Bagnall

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

  • Darren Flood

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

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    Abstract

    The Reserve Bank has completed its second study of consumers' use of payment instruments. The study indicates that cash remains the most common form of payment by consumers. It is used extensively in situations where average payment values are low and where quick transaction times are preferred. Nonetheless, cash use as a share of total payments has declined, falling as a share of both the number and value of payments. Two important factors contributing to this decline are the substitution of cards for cash use, particularly for low-value payments, and the increasing adoption of online payments.

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    File URL: http://www.rba.gov.au/publications/bulletin/2011/sep/pdf/bu-0911-7.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Reserve Bank of Australia in its journal RBA Bulletin.

    Volume (Year): (2011)
    Issue (Month): (September)
    Pages: 55-62

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    Handle: RePEc:rba:rbabul:sep2011-07

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    Related research

    Keywords: withdrawals; payments; payments survey; transaction diary; payments use study; payments system; contactless payments; online payments;

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    Cited by:
    1. Carlos Arango & Yassine Bouhdaoui & David Bounie & Martina Eschelbach & Lola Hern�ndez, 2014. "Cash management and payment choices: A simulation model with international comparisons," DNB Working Papers, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department 409, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    2. Arianna Cowling, 2011. "Recent Trends in Counterfeiting," RBA Bulletin, Reserve Bank of Australia, Reserve Bank of Australia, pages 63-70, September.
    3. Nicole Jonker & Anneke Kosse & Lola Hern�ndez, 2012. "Cash usage in the Netherlands: How much, where, when, who and whenever one wants?," DNB Occasional Studies, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department 1002, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.

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