Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Exchange Market Pressure and Monetary Policy: Asia and Latin America in the 1990s

Contents:

Author Info

  • Evan Tanner

    (International Monetary Fund)

Abstract

Exchange market pressure (EMP), the sum of exchange rate depreciation and reserve outflows (scaled by base money), summarizes the flow excess supply of money in a managed exchange rate regime. This paper examines Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Indonesia, Korea, and Thailand, and finds that monetary policy affects EMP as generally expected: contractionary monetary policy helps to reduce EMP. The monetary policy stance is best measured by domestic credit growth (since interest rates contain both policy- and market-determined elements). In response to higher EMP, monetary authorities boosted domestic credit growth both in Mexico (confirming previous research) and in the Asian countries. Copyright 2001, International Monetary Fund

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.imf.org/External/Pubs/FT/staffp/2001/01/pdf/tanner.pdf
File Function: main text
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Palgrave Macmillan in its journal IMF Staff Papers.

Volume (Year): 47 (2001)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 2

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:pal:imfstp:v:47:y:2001:i:3:p:2

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/

Order Information:
Postal: Palgrave Macmillan Journals, Subscription Department, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire RG21 6XS, UK
Email:
Web: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/pal/subscribe/index.html

Related research

Keywords:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Mody, Ashoka & Taylor, Mark P., 2007. "Regional vulnerability: The case of East Asia," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(8), pages 1292-1310, December.
  2. Feldkircher, Martin & Horvath, Roman & Rusnak, Marek, 2013. "Exchange market pressures during the financial crisis: A Bayesian model averaging evidence," BOFIT Discussion Papers 11/2013, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
  3. Augustine A. Boakye & Hassan Molana, 2007. "Fluctuation in the International Currency Reserves of Less Developed Countries: HIPC vs Non-HIPC," Dundee Discussion Papers in Economics 203, Economic Studies, University of Dundee.
  4. Simone Bertoli & Giampiero Gallo & Giorgio Ricchiuti, 2006. "Exchange Market Pressure: Some Caveats In Empirical Applications," Econometrics Working Papers Archive wp2006_17, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Statistica, Informatica, Applicazioni "G. Parenti".
  5. Hallwood, C. Paul & Marsh, Ian W., 2004. "Exchange market pressure on the pound-dollar exchange rate: 1925-1931," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 249-264, August.
  6. Evan Tanner, 2002. "Exchange Market Pressure, Currency Crises, and Monetary Policy," IMF Working Papers 02/14, International Monetary Fund.
  7. Allen, Franklin & Gu, Xian & Kowalewski, Oskar, 2012. "Financial crisis, structure and reform," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 2960-2973.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pal:imfstp:v:47:y:2001:i:3:p:2. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Elizabeth Gale).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.