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Sidelined Investors, Trading-Generated News, and Security Returns

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Author Info

  • H. Henry Cao

    (University of North Carolina)

  • Joshua D. Coval

    (Harvard University)

  • David Hirshleifer

    (Ohio State University)

Abstract

This article studies information blockages and the asymmetric release of information in a security market with fixed setup costs of trading. In this setting, "sidelined" investors may delay trading until price movements validate their private signals. Trading thereby internally generates the arrival of further news to the market. This leads to (1) negative skewness following price run-ups and positive skewness following price rundowns (even though the model is ex ante symmetric), (2) a lack of correspondence between large price changes and the arrival of external information, and (3) increases in volatility following large price changes. Copyright 2002, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Society for Financial Studies in its journal Review of Financial Studies.

Volume (Year): 15 (2002)
Issue (Month): 2 (March)
Pages: 615-648

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Handle: RePEc:oup:rfinst:v:15:y:2002:i:2:p:615-648

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Cited by:
  1. José M. Marín & Jacques Olivier, 2006. "The dog that did not bark: Insider trading and crashes," Economics Working Papers 948, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  2. Hirshleifer, David & Teoh, Siew Hong, 2008. "Thought and Behavior Contagion in Capital Markets," MPRA Paper 9142, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Ben-David, Itzhak & Hirshleifer, David, 2011. "Beyond the Disposition Effect: Do Investors Really Like Gains More Than Losses?," Working Paper Series 2011-13, Ohio State University, Charles A. Dice Center for Research in Financial Economics.
  4. Chen, Joseph & Hong, Harrison & Stein, Jeremy C., 2001. "Forecasting crashes: trading volume, past returns, and conditional skewness in stock prices," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 345-381, September.
  5. Blau, Benjamin M. & Smith, Jason M., 2014. "Autocorrelation in daily short-sale volume," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 31-41.
  6. Biais, Bruno & Weber, Martin, 2008. "Hindsight Bias and Investment Performance," IDEI Working Papers 476, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
  7. Lai, Jing-yi, 2012. "Shock-dependent conditional skewness in international aggregate stock markets," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 72-83.
  8. Alvarez-Ramírez, José & Rodríguez, Eduardo, 2012. "Temporal variations of serial correlations of trading volume in the US stock market," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 391(16), pages 4128-4135.

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