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Regulation and Productivity Performance

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  • Nicholas Crafts

Abstract

The paper reviews theory and evidence on the ways in which regulation affects productivity outcomes. In a context of endogenous growth, it is argued that traditional measures of compliance costs miss the potentially most important impacts of regulation on productivity which occur through changes in incentives to invest and to innovate. Recent attempts to measure cross-country variations in the strength of product-market and employment regulation are considered and some weaknesses are highlighted. Nevertheless, consistent with endogenous growth models, there appears to be quite strong evidence that regulations which inhibit entry into product markets have an adverse effect on TFP growth in OECD countries. Although there are some discrepancies in the evidence, on most measures the UK appears lightly regulated relative to France and Germany, and this may have contributed to a reduction in the recent past in the UK's TFP gap. Copyright 2006, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Oxford Review of Economic Policy.

Volume (Year): 22 (2006)
Issue (Month): 2 (Summer)
Pages: 186-202

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Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:22:y:2006:i:2:p:186-202

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Cited by:
  1. Wulong Gu & Amélie Lafrance, 2010. "Productivity Growth in Canadian and U.S. Regulated Industries," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 19, pages 50-65, Spring.
  2. Xu, Lixin Colin, 2010. "The effects of business environments on development : surveying new firm-level evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5402, The World Bank.
  3. Klaus Weyerstrass & Johannes Jaenicke, 2011. "Is more competition conducive to the macroeconomic performance in the euro area?," Empirica, Springer, vol. 38(3), pages 351-380, July.
  4. Renaud Bourlès & Gilbert Cette & Jimmy Lopez & Jacques Mairesse & Giuseppe Nicoletti, 2010. "Do Product Market Regulations in Upstream Sectors Curb Productivity Growth? Panel Data Evidence for OECD Countries," NBER Working Papers 16520, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Flora Bellone & Jérémy Mallen-Pisano, 2013. "Is Misallocation Higher in France than in the United States?," GREDEG Working Papers 2013-38, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
  6. Paul Conway & Giuseppe Nicoletti, 2007. "Product Market Regulation and Productivity Convergence: OECD Evidence and Implications for Canada," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 15, pages 3-24, Fall.
  7. Nicolas Dromel & Gilbert Cette & Renaud Bourlès & Philippe Askenazy & Philippe Aghion, 2008. "Distance à la frontière technologique, rigidités de marché, éducation et croissance," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 419(1), pages 11-30.
  8. Aghion, Ph. & Askenazy, Ph. & Bourlès, R. & Cette, G. & Dromel, N., 2009. "Education, Market Rigidities and Growth," Working papers 229, Banque de France.
  9. Machek Ondrej, 2012. "Data Issues In Total Factor Productivity Benchmarking: A Central European Perspective," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(2), pages 219-225, December.
  10. Oliver Falck & Simon Wiederhold, 2013. "Nachfrageorientierte Innovationspolitik: Bestandsaufnahme und ökonomische Bewertung," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 51.
  11. Fiori, Giuseppe & Nicoletti, Giuseppe & Scarpetta, Stefano & Schiantarelli, Fabio, 2007. "Employment Outcomes and the Interaction Between Product and Labor Market Deregulation: Are They Substitutes or Complements?," IZA Discussion Papers 2770, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Blind, Knut, 2012. "The influence of regulations on innovation: A quantitative assessment for OECD countries," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 391-400.
  13. Bart van Ark & Mary O'Mahoney & Marcel P. Timmer, 2008. "The Productivity Gap between Europe and the United States: Trends and Causes," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 22(1), pages 25-44, Winter.

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