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Pension reform and saving in Britain

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Author Info

  • R Disney
  • C Emmerson
  • M Wakefield

Abstract

The paper examines the pension programme in Britain, focusing on reforms that have increased the fraction of the work-force opting out of public provision and that have permitted individuals to choose their private pension provider. It also examines the issue of pension provision and household saving. The paper highlights the disparities in retirement saving behaviour across types of pension provision and different households. The paper discusses the policy issues of the adequacy of household saving, and the impact of pension reform on household saving and the public finances. Copyright 2001, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Oxford Review of Economic Policy.

Volume (Year): 17 (2001)
Issue (Month): 1 (Spring)
Pages: 70-94

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Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:17:y:2001:i:1:p:70-94

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Web page: http://oxrep.oupjournals.org/

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson & Sarah Smith, 2003. "Pension Reform and Economic Performance in Britain in the 1980s and 1990s," NBER Working Papers 9556, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Susanne Pech, 2004. "Portfolio decisions on life annuities and financial assets with longevity and income uncertainty," Economics working papers 2004-14, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  3. Johann Brunner & Susanne Pech, 2008. "Optimum taxation of life annuities," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 285-303, February.
  4. Robert Jahoda & Jiøí Špalek, 2009. "Pension Reform through Voluntary Opt-Out: The Czech Case," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 59(4), pages 309-333, Oktober.
  5. Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson & Matthew Wakefield, 2007. "Pension Provision and Retirement Saving: Lessons from the United Kingdom," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 176, McMaster University.
  6. Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson & Matthew Wakefield, 2007. "Tax reform and retirement saving incentives: evidence from the introduction of stakeholder pensions in the UK," IFS Working Papers W07/19, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  7. Susanne Pech, 2002. "Tax incentives for private life annuities and the social security reform: Effects on consumption and on adverse selection," Economics working papers 2002-09, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  8. K. Mc Morrow & W. R�ger, 2002. "EU pension reform - An overview of the debate and an empirical assessment of the main policy reform options," European Economy - Economic Papers 162, Directorate General Economic and Monetary Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
  9. Axel H. Börsch-Supan & Michela Coppola & Anette Reil-Held, 2012. "Riester Pensions in Germany: Design, Dynamics, Targetting Success and Crowding-In," NBER Working Papers 18014, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Orazio P. Attanasio & Susann Rohwedder, 2003. "Pension Wealth and Household Saving: Evidence from Pension Reforms in the United Kingdom," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1499-1521, December.
  11. Orazio Attanasio & Susanne Rohwedder, 2001. "Pension wealth and household saving: evidence from pension reforms in the UK," IFS Working Papers W01/21, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  12. Axel Börsch-Supan & Anette Reil-Held & Daniel Schunk, 2007. "The savings behaviour of German households: First Experiences with state promoted private pensions," MEA discussion paper series 07136, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.

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