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Technological variety, technological change and a geography of production techniques

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  • David L. Rigby
  • Jürgen Essletzbichler
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    Abstract

    How much heterogeneity in techniques of production exists within the economy, and how does that heterogeneity move over time? In this paper we show that the range of production techniques employed by establishments within individual manufacturing industries is large. We go on to show that technological heterogeneity persists over time: there is no evidence of convergence to best-practice or some other point in technology space. Next, we explore the geography of variety and reveal that there are significant spatial differences in the production techniques employed by manufacturing plants in the same industry. Finally, we examine how these geographical differences move over time, measuring the processes that drive the creation and destruction of the range of production techniques across industries and regions in the US economy. Copyright 2006, Oxford University Press.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Journal of Economic Geography.

    Volume (Year): 6 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 45-70

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    Handle: RePEc:oup:jecgeo:v:6:y:2006:i:1:p:45-70

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    Cited by:
    1. Ron Boschma & Koen Frenken, 2011. "The emerging empirics of evolutionary economic geography," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1101, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Jan 2011.
    2. Frank Van Oort, 2013. "Agglomeration Economics Beyond the Specialisation-Diversity Controversy," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1313, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Aug 2013.
    3. M. Nicotra & M. Romano & M. Giudice, 2014. "The Evolution Dynamic of a Cluster Knowledge Network: The Role of Firms’ Absorptive Capacity," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer, vol. 5(2), pages 240-264, June.
    4. Kutsenko, E., 2012. "Path Dependence in Spatial Distribution of Economic Activity: Bad News for Empiric Research of Agglomeration Effects," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 14(2), pages 10-26.
    5. Carolina Castaldi & Koen Frenken & Bart Los, 2013. "Related Variety, Unrelated Variety and Technological Breakthroughs: an analysis of U.S. state-level patenting," Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS) working paper series 13-03, Eindhoven Center for Innovation Studies (ECIS), revised Feb 2013.
    6. Heshmati, Almas & Kumbhakar, Subal C., 2011. "A General Model of Technical Change with an Application to the OECD Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 6004, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. M. Nicotra & M. Romano & M. Giudice, 2014. "The Evolution Dynamic of a Cluster Knowledge Network: the Role of Firms' Absorptive Capacity," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 70-93, March.
    8. Rikard Eriksson & Martin Henning & Anne Otto, 2014. "Regional and industrial mobility of workers leaving mature industries. A study of individuals who exit the Swedish shipbuilding industry 1970-2000," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1415, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Jul 2014.
    9. Jürgen Essletzbichler, 2005. "Diversity, stability and regional growth in the U.S. (1975-2002)," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 0513, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Sep 2005.
    10. David Rigby, 2012. "The Geography of Knowledge Relatedness and Technological Diversification in U.S. Cities," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1218, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Oct 2012.

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