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Female Self-Employment and Demand for Flexible, Nonstandard Work Schedules

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  • Lombard, Karen V
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    Abstract

    Motivated by the rising importance of female self-employment, this article develops and estimates a two-step empirical model to explain why married women choose self-employment over wage-salary employment. The article also develops a bounded influence regression model to estimate self employment wage equations. In sum, a woman is more likely to choose self-employment the greater her relative earnings potential as self-employed, the greater her demand for flexibility, the greater her demand for a nonstandard work week, and if her husband has health insurance. The increase in women's earnings potential as self-employed explains most of the increase in their self-employment from 1979 to 1990. Copyright 2001 by Oxford University Press.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Economic Inquiry.

    Volume (Year): 39 (2001)
    Issue (Month): 2 (April)
    Pages: 214-37

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    Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:39:y:2001:i:2:p:214-37

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    Cited by:
    1. Henning Lohmann, 2001. "Self-employed or employee, full-time or part-time? Gender differences in the determinants and conditions for self-employment in Europe and the US," MZES Working Papers 38, MZES.
    2. Amelia Biehl & Tami Gurley-Calvez & Brian Hill, 2014. "Self-employment of older Americans: do recessions matter?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 297-309, February.
    3. Robert Fairlie & Alicia Robb, 2008. "Gender Differences in Business Performance: Evidence from the Characteristics of Business Owners Survey," Working Papers 08-39, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    4. Velamuri, Malathi, 2009. "Taxes, Health Insurance and Women's Self-Employment," MPRA Paper 50474, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Apr 2012.
    5. Bell, David N.F. & Rutherford, Alasdair C., 2013. "Older Workers and Working Time," IZA Discussion Papers 7546, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Laura Dague & Thomas DeLeire & Lindsey Leininger, 2014. "The Effect of Public Insurance Coverage for Childless Adults on Labor Supply," NBER Working Papers 20111, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Zissimopoulos, Julie M. & Karoly, Lynn A., 2007. "Transitions to self-employment at older ages: The role of wealth, health, health insurance and other factors," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 269-295, April.
    8. Philipp Koellinger & Maria Minniti & Christian Schade, 2008. "Seeing the World with Different Eyes," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 08-035/3, Tinbergen Institute, revised 11 Mar 2011.
    9. Garen, John, 2006. "Use of employees and alternative work arrangements in the United States: a law, economics, and organizations perspective," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 107-141, February.
    10. Elena Bardasi & Shwetlena Sabarwal & Katherine Terrell, 2011. "How do female entrepreneurs perform? Evidence from three developing regions," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 417-441, November.
    11. Golden, Lonnie & Wiens-Tuers, Barbara, 2006. "To your happiness? Extra hours of labor supply and worker well-being," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 382-397, April.
    12. Eichhorst, Werner & Kahanec, Martin & Kendzia, Michael J. & Wehner, Caroline & al., et, 2013. "Report No. 54: Social Protection Rights of Economically Dependent Self-employed Workers," IZA Research Reports 54, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Hiroyuki Okamuro & Kenta Ikeuchi, 2012. "Work-Life Balance and Gender Differences in Self-Employment Income during the Start-up Stage in Japan," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd12-260, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    14. Rachida Justo, 2008. "Gender, family situation and the exit event: reassessing the opportunity-costs of business ownership," Working Papers Economia wp08-26, Instituto de Empresa, Area of Economic Environment.
    15. Dague, Laura & DeLeire, Thomas & Leininger, Lindsey, 2014. "The Effect of Public Insurance Coverage for Childless Adults on Labor Supply," IZA Discussion Papers 8187, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    16. Pia Arenius & Stefan Ehrstedt, 2008. "Variation in the level of activity across the stages of the entrepreneurial startup process-evidence from 35 countries," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 35(2 Year 20), pages 133-152, December.

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