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Globalisation, history and development: a tale of two centuries

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  • Deepak Nayyar
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    Abstract

    This paper situates globalisation in historical perspective to analyse its implications for development. It sketches a picture of globalisation during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. A comparison of these two epochs reveals striking parallels, unexpected similarities and important differences. It shows that globalisation did not lead to rapid growth and economic convergence in the world, either then or now. Indeed, growth slowed down, and income levels diverged, while the gap between the industrialised and developing countries widened, in both epochs. The story of globalisation, it turns out, does not conform to the fairy tale about convergence and development. Copyright 2006, Oxford University Press.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cje/bei090
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Cambridge Journal of Economics.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 137-159

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    Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:30:y:2006:i:1:p:137-159

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    Cited by:
    1. Shachmurove, Yochanan & Spiegel, Uriel, 2013. "Sustainable effects of technological progress and trade liberalization," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 956-964.
    2. Marek Jemala, 2009. "Strategic Business Alliances: Qualitative Analysis of Specific Factors of Business Clusters," Acta Oeconomica Pragensia, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2009(4), pages 19-33.
    3. Nayyar, Deepak, 2006. "Development through Globalization?," Working Paper Series RP2006/29, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Sebastian Florian Enea & Silvia Palaºcã, 2012. "Globalization Versus Segregation - Business Cycles Synchronization In Europe," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 4, pages 668-692, December.
    5. Nayyar, Deepak, 2008. "China, India, Brazil and South Africa in the World Economy: Engines of Growth?," Working Paper Series DP2008/05, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Yochanan Shachmurove & Uriel Spiegel, 2013. "Are All Technological Improvements Beneficial? Absolutely Not," PIER Working Paper Archive 13-027, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    7. Deepak Nayyar, 2010. "China, India, Brazil and South Africa in the World Economy: Engines of Growth?," Working Papers id:3039, eSocialSciences.

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