Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Conceptualising Environmental Collective Action: Why Gender Matters

Contents:

Author Info

  • Agarwal, Bina
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This paper demonstrates how institutions for natural resource management (such as community forestry groups), which appear to be participative, equitable and efficient, can be found lacking on all three counts from a gender perspective. It also examines possible gender differences in social networks, values and motivations. Although there is little to suggest that women are inherently more conservationist than men, the distinctness of women's social networks embodying prior experience of successful cooperation, their higher dependence on these networks (as also on the commons in general), and their potentially greater group homogeneity relative to men, could provide an important (and largely ignored) basis for organising sustainable environmental collective action. The paper also outlines the factors that can constrain or facilitate women's participation in formal environmental management groups. Illustrative examples are drawn from rural South Asia. Copyright 2000 by Oxford University Press.

    Download Info

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Cambridge Journal of Economics.

    Volume (Year): 24 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 3 (May)
    Pages: 283-310

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:24:y:2000:i:3:p:283-310

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, UK
    Fax: 01865 267 985
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.cje.oupjournals.org/

    Order Information:
    Web: http://www.oup.co.uk/journals

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    RePEc Biblio mentions

    As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography for Economics:
    1. > Schools of Economic Thought, Epistemology of Economics > Heterodox Approaches > Ecological Economics > Participation, Representation and Deliberation
    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Das, Nimai, 2009. "Understanding of Social Capital in Gender-based Participatory JFM Programme: An Evidence from West Bengal," MPRA Paper 15304, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Padmanabhan, Martina, 2011. "Women and men as conservers, users and managers of agrobiodiversity," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 968-976.
    3. Fischer, Elisabeth & Qaim, Matin, 2012. "Gender, Agricultural Commercialization, and Collective Action in Kenya," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126659, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Martina Aruna Padmanabhan, 2008. "Collective action in agrobiodiversity management: gendered rules of reputation, trust and reciprocity in Kerala, India," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 83-97.
    5. Kurian, M. & Dietz, T., 2003. "Irrigation and collective action: a study in method with reference to the Shiwalik Hills, Haryana," ISS Working Papers - General Series 19133, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    6. Panda, Smita Mishra, 2006. "Women's collective action and sustainable water management: case of SEWA's water campaign in Gujarat, India," CAPRi working papers 61, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Michael Kremer & Alix Peterson Zwane, 2007. "Cost-Effective Prevention of Diarrheal Diseases: A Critical Review," Working Papers 117, Center for Global Development.
    8. Padmanabhan, Martina Aruna, 2006. "Collective action in plant genetic resources management: gendered rules of reputation, trust and reciprocity in Kerala, India," CAPRi working papers 56, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Humphries, Sally & Classen, Lauren & Jiménez, José & Sierra, Fredy & Gallardo, Omar & Gómez, Marvin, 2012. "Opening Cracks for the Transgression of Social Boundaries: An Evaluation of the Gender Impacts of Farmer Research Teams in Honduras," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(10), pages 2078-2095.
    10. Westermann, Olaf & Ashby, Jacqueline & Pretty, Jules, 2005. "Gender and social capital: The importance of gender differences for the maturity and effectiveness of natural resource management groups," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(11), pages 1783-1799, November.
    11. Agrawal, Arun, 2001. "Common Property Institutions and Sustainable Governance of Resources," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(10), pages 1649-1672, October.
    12. Das, Nimai & Sarker, Debnarayan, 2008. "Social Capital and Network Externalities: Evidence from Gender Sensitive JFM Programme in West Bengal," MPRA Paper 15232, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Agarwal, Bina, 2010. "Does Women's Proportional Strength Affect their Participation? Governing Local Forests in South Asia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 98-112, January.
    14. Naidu, Sirisha C., 2011. "Gendered effects of work and participation in collective forest management," MPRA Paper 31091, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Bina Agarwal, . "The Hidden Side Of Group Behaviour: A Gender Analysis Of Community Forestry Groups," QEH Working Papers qehwps76, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
    16. Agarwal, Bina, 2001. "Participatory Exclusions, Community Forestry, and Gender: An Analysis for South Asia and a Conceptual Framework," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(10), pages 1623-1648, October.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:24:y:2000:i:3:p:283-310. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.