Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

International Evidence on the Long-Run Impact of Inflation

Contents:

Author Info

  • Rapach, David E
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    In this paper, I use a structural vector autoregression framework to analyze the effects of a permanent change in inflation on the long-run real interest rate and real output level in 14 industrialized countries. Long-run monetary superneutrality is rejected for all 14 countries using annual data: the results indicate that a permanent increase in inflation lowers the long-run real interest rate in each country; a permanent increase in inflation also increases the long-run real output level in a number of countries. Long-run monetary superneutrality is also rejected for four out of the five countries examined using quarterly data.

    Download Info

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Blackwell Publishing in its journal Journal of Money, Credit and Banking.

    Volume (Year): 35 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 1 (February)
    Pages: 23-48

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:35:y:2003:i:1:p:23-48

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0022-2879

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Gillman, Max & Nakov, Anton, 2005. "Granger Causality of the Inflation-Growth Mirror in Accession Countries," CEPR Discussion Papers 4845, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Eggoh, Jude C. & Khan, Muhammad, 2014. "On the nonlinear relationship between inflation and economic growth," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 133-143.
    3. Ricardo Lagos & Guillaume Rocheteau, 2005. "Inflation, Output, And Welfare," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(2), pages 495-522, 05.
    4. Giorgio Canarella & Stephen M. Miller & Stephen K. Pollard, 2012. "Purchasing Power Parity between the UK and the Euro Area," Working Papers 1208, University of Nevada, Las Vegas , Department of Economics.
    5. Beyer, Andreas & Haug, Alfred A. & Dewald, William G., 2009. "Structural breaks, cointegration and the Fisher effect," Working Paper Series 1013, European Central Bank.
    6. Christie Smith, 2004. "The long-run effects of monetary policy on output growth," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 67, September.
    7. C C Tsong & A Hachicha, 2014. "Revisiting the Fisher Hypothesis for Several Selected Developing Economies: a Quantile Cointegration Approach," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 19(1), pages 57-72, March.
    8. Tierney, Heather L.R. & Pan, Bing, 2009. "A Poisson Regression Examination of the Relationship between Website Traffic and Search Engine Queries," MPRA Paper 19895, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 10 Jan 2010.
    9. Reed, Robert R. & Ghossoub, Edgar A., 2012. "The effects of monetary policy at different stages of economic development," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(1), pages 138-141.
    10. Bhattacharya, Joydeep & Haslag, Joseph & Russell, Steven, 2004. "The Role of Money in Two Alternative Models: When is the Friedman Rule Optimal, and Why?," Staff General Research Papers 11950, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    11. von Thadden, Leopold, 2012. "Monetary policy rules in an OLG model with non-superneutral money," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 147-166.
    12. Max Gillman & Michal Kejak, 2007. " Inflation, Financial Development and Human Capital-Based Endogenous Growth: an Explanation of Ten Empirical Findings," CDMA Conference Paper Series 0703, Centre for Dynamic Macroeconomic Analysis.
    13. John Keating, 2004. "Interpreting Permanent and Transitory Shocks to Output When Aggregate Demand May Not Be Neutral in the Long-run," Econometric Society 2004 North American Summer Meetings 608, Econometric Society.
    14. CĂ©line Gauthier & Fu Chun Li, 2006. "Linking Real Activity and Financial Markets: The Bonds, Equity, and Money (BEAM) Model," Working Papers 06-42, Bank of Canada.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:35:y:2003:i:1:p:23-48. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.