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Do the Elderly "Vote with Their Feet"?

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  • Conway, Karen Smith
  • Houtenville, Andrew J
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    Abstract

    This research explores whether the elderly 'vote with their feet' by migrating to states with government policies that treat them favorably. A theoretical model is presented that clarifies the effects of cost-of-living, amenities, and the public sector on migration decisions and that informs our empirical analysis. Using state-level migration data from the 1990 Census, the authors estimate out-migration and in-migration equations that suggest that the public sector is an important determinant of elderly migration but in sometimes unexpected ways. Their results lend some support for the Tiebout hypothesis but they also raise serious questions about the nature of the elderly's preferences for government policy. Copyright 1998 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Public Choice.

    Volume (Year): 97 (1998)
    Issue (Month): 4 (December)
    Pages: 663-85

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:97:y:1998:i:4:p:663-85

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    Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100332

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    Cited by:
    1. Johnson, Erik & Walsh, Randall, 2013. "The effect of property taxes on vacation home growth rates: Evidence from Michigan," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(5), pages 740-750.
    2. Tosun, Mehmet S. & Williamson, Claudia R. & Yakovlev, Pavel, 2009. "Population Aging, Elderly Migration and Education Spending: Intergenerational Conflict Revisited," IZA Discussion Papers 4161, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Richard Cebula & Christopher Duquette & Franklin Mixon, 2013. "Factors Influencing the State-Level Settlement Pattern of the Undocumented Immigrant Population in the United States," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 41(3), pages 203-213, September.
    4. Cebula, Richard & Clark, Jeff, 2012. "An Extension of the Tiebout Hypothesis of Voting with One's Feet: The Medicaid Magnet Hypothesis," MPRA Paper 52431, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Alexander, Gigi & Foley, Maggie, 2014. "Determinants of Migration, Revisited," MPRA Paper 56967, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Mark Gius, 2011. "The effect of income taxes on interstate migration: an analysis by age and race," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 46(1), pages 205-218, February.
    7. Richard Cebula, 2002. "Net interstate population growth rates and the Tiebout-Tullock hypothesis: New empirical evidence, 1990–2000," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 30(4), pages 414-421, December.
    8. Coomes, Paul A. & Hoyt, William H., 2008. "Income taxes and the destination of movers to multistate MSAs," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 920-937, May.
    9. Richard J. Cebula & J.R. Clark, 2011. "Migration, Economic Freedom, and Personal Freedom: An Empirical Analysis," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 27(Fall 2011), pages 43-62.
    10. Purvi Sevak & Martin Farnham, 2002. "Local Fiscal Policy and Retiree Migration: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study," Economics Working Paper Archive at Hunter College 02/7, Hunter College Department of Economics.
    11. Cebula, Richard J., 2002. "Migration and the Tiebout-Tullock Hypothesis Revisited," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 32(1), pages 87-96, Winter/Sp.
    12. María Martínez Torres, . "Flujos migratorios interregionales en España: Un modelo de ecuaciones simultáneas," Studies on the Spanish Economy 207, FEDEA.
    13. Conway, Karen Smith & Houtenville, Andrew J., 2001. "Elderly Migration and State Fiscal Policy: Evidence from the 1990 Census Migration Flows," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 54(n. 1), pages 103-24, March.

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