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Science Is Golden: Academic R&D and University Patents

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  • Coupe, Tom

Abstract

Many studies have shown indirect effects of academic research by linking academic research to firm patents. However, since the Bayh-Dole Act, universities are allowed to patent inventions that were funded by federal money and to retain the royalties that these patents generate. As a consequence, universities now are interested in protecting their "profitable" discoveries, just like any commercial firm doing R&D. In this paper, we apply the econometric techniques traditionally used to estimate the patent production function of firms to data on the patents of American universities. We find that more money spent on academic research leads to more university patents, with elasticities that are similar to those found for commercial firms. In addition, we provide estimates of the effect of establishing a Technology Transfer Office on a university's patent output. Copyright 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Technology Transfer.

Volume (Year): 28 (2003)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 31-46

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:28:y:2003:i:1:p:31-46

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=104998

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Cited by:
  1. Saul Lach & Mark Schankerman, 2008. "Incentives and invention in universities," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 25475, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Van Looy, Bart & Landoni, Paolo & Callaert, Julie & van Pottelsberghe, Bruno & Sapsalis, Eleftherios & Debackere, Koenraad, 2011. "Entrepreneurial effectiveness of European universities: An empirical assessment of antecedents and trade-offs," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 553-564, May.
  3. Hülsbeck, Marcel & Lehmann, Erik E., 2010. "The role of regional knowledge production in university technology transfer: Isolating coevolutionary effects," UO Working Papers 01-10, University of Augsburg, Chair of Management and Organization.
  4. Amit Shovon Ray & Sabyasachi Saha, 2010. "PATENTING PUBLIC-FUNDED RESEARCH FOR TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER : A Conceptual-Empirical Synthesis of US Evidence and Lessons for India," Development Economics Working Papers 22918, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  5. Litan, Robert E. & Mitchell, Lesa & Reedy, E.J., 2007. "Commercializing University Innovations: A Better Way," Working paper 449, Regulation2point0.
  6. Branco Ponomariov, 2008. "Effects of university characteristics on scientists’ interactions with the private sector: an exploratory assessment," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 33(5), pages 485-503, October.
  7. Frosch, Katharina & Tivig, Thusnelda, 2007. "Age, human capital and the geography of innovation," Thuenen-Series of Applied Economic Theory 71, University of Rostock, Institute of Economics.
  8. Goddard, John Gabriel & Isabelle, Marc, 2007. "Explaining the balance between publications and patents as outputs from public-private collaborative R&D: An empirical study on French data," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/5016, Paris Dauphine University.
  9. Robert E. Litan & Lesa Mitchell & E. J. Reedy, 2008. "Commercializing University Innovations: Alternative Approaches," NBER Chapters, in: Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 8, pages 31-57 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Manuel Acosta & Daniel Coronado & Mª Dolores Leon & Mª Rosario Marin, 2005. "Determining factors of patent generation in Andalucia (Spain) - Does public policy support technological knowledge generation in universities?," ERSA conference papers ersa05p269, European Regional Science Association.
  11. Bradley, Samantha R. & Hayter, Christopher S. & Link, Albert N., 2013. "Models and Methods of University Technology Transfer," Working Papers 13-10, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.

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