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Motorist Use of Safety Equipment: Expected Benefits or Risk Incompetence?

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  • Blomquist, Glenn C

Abstract

Seat belts, child safety seats, and motorcycle helmets are not used all the time by drivers, parents, or riders when they travel. Since the safety advantages of these types of equipment are well established, nonuse could be due to risk incompetence. This article starts instead with risk competence to see to what extent use can be attributed to the net benefits expected by individual motorists. Logit analysis of microdata from the Nationwide Personal Transportation Study shows that use is more likely with larger perceived net benefits for all three types of motorists. They are therefore risk competent enough to respond to changes in net benefits in ways and degrees that are qualitatively and ordinally correct. Copyright 1991 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Risk and Uncertainty.

Volume (Year): 4 (1991)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 135-52

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jrisku:v:4:y:1991:i:2:p:135-52

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100299

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Cited by:
  1. Khwaja, Ahmed & Sloan, Frank & Salm, Martin, 2006. "Evidence on preferences and subjective beliefs of risk takers: The case of smokers," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 667-682, July.
  2. Glenn C. Blomquist, 2004. "Self-Protection and Averting Behavior, Values of Statistical Lives, and Benefit Cost Analysis of Environmental Policy," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 89-110, 03.
  3. Dickie, Mark & Gerking, Shelby, 1997. "Genetic Risk Factors and Offsetting Behavior: The Case of Skin Cancer," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 81-97, October.
  4. Soma Bhattacharya & Anna Alberini & Maureen Cropper, 2007. "The value of mortality risk reductions in Delhi, India," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 21-47, February.
  5. repec:reg:wpaper:209 is not listed on IDEAS

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