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A Detailed Study of Financial Exclusion in the UK

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  • James Devlin

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    Abstract

    The concept of financial exclusion has been the subject of increasing interest and debate and is characterised as a situation where a proportion of the population have limited access to mainstream financial services. Previous studies of financial exclusion in the UK have generally focused on a particular financial service, such as bank accounts, and have incorporated differing methods and models of investigation. Thus, comparing and contrasting significant influences on exclusion across a range of financial services proves problematic. The current study uses a common model to test and compare influences on exclusion for a wide range of financial services. Findings show that the most consistent and significant influences on financial exclusion are employment status, household income, and housing tenure, closely followed by marital status, age, and level of academic qualification. A more complex relationship with the remaining explanatory variables is apparent. Copyright Springer 2005

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10603-004-7313-y
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Consumer Policy.

    Volume (Year): 28 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 1 (December)
    Pages: 75-108

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:jcopol:v:28:y:2005:i:1:p:75-108

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    Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100283

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    Cited by:
    1. Andrew Crane & Bahar Kazmi, 2010. "Business and Children: Mapping Impacts, Managing Responsibilities," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 91(4), pages 567-586, February.
    2. Simpson, Wayne & Buckland, Jerry, 2009. "Examining evidence of financial and credit exclusion in Canada from 1999 to 2005," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 966-976, December.
    3. Mark Freel & Sara Carter & Stephen Tagg & Colin Mason, 2012. "The latent demand for bank debt: characterizing “discouraged borrowers”," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 38(4), pages 399-418, May.
    4. Botti, Fabrizio & Bollino, Carlo Andrea, 2012. "Financial exclusion and the cost of incomplete participation," MPRA Paper 44065, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Yener Altunbas & John Thornton & Alper Kara, 2010. "What Determines Financial Exclusion? Evidence from Bolivian Household Data," Working Papers 10018, Bangor Business School, Prifysgol Bangor University (Cymru / Wales).

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