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Models of Military Expenditure

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  • Smith, R P

Abstract

A brief review of the extensive empirical literature devoted to explaining levels of military expenditure indicates a wide variety of unreconciled results. However, comparing the alternative models is not straightforward. This paper uses British post-war military expenditures to illustrate some of the methodological issues involved in model comparison, evaluation and selection. Starting from two published models for the U.K., a systematic specification search leads to a new model, which dominates alternative specifications, passes a wide range of misspecification tests, and also fits well to French data. Copyright 1989 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of Applied Econometrics.

Volume (Year): 4 (1989)
Issue (Month): 4 (Oct.-Dec.)
Pages: 345-59

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Handle: RePEc:jae:japmet:v:4:y:1989:i:4:p:345-59

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Cited by:
  1. Levine, Paul & Smith, Ron, 1997. "The arms trade and the stability of regional arms races," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 21(2-3), pages 631-654.
  2. Ghislain Dutheil de la Rochère & Jean-Michel Josselin & Yvon Rocaboy, 2011. "The role of aggregation technologies in the provision of supranational public goods: A reconsideration of NATO’s strategies," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 85-103, March.
  3. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2003. "Domestic political and external security determinants of the demand for greek military expenditure," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 437-445.
  4. Paul Dunne & Beverly Edkins, 2005. "The demand for Food in South Africa," Working Papers 0509, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  5. Aamer S. Abu-Qarn & Yasmine M. Abdelfattah & J. Paul Dunne & Shadwa Zaher, 2012. "The Demand for Military Spending in Egypt," Working Papers 1210, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
  6. J. Paul Dunne & Eftychia Nikolaidou & Nikolaos Mylonidis, 2003. "The demand for military spending in the peripheral economies of Europe," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 447-460.
  7. Nasir M. Khilji & Akhtar Mahmood, 1997. "Military Expenditures and Economic Growth in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 36(4), pages 791-808.
  8. Young-Wan Goo & Seung-Nyeon Kim, 2009. "A study on the military alliance of South Korea–United States with the existence of threat from North Korea: a public good demand approach," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 597-610, June.
  9. Reiss, Daniel G, 2008. "Gastos de Defesa no Brasil: análise qualitativa do orçamento nacional no período de 2001 a 2007
    [Defense Expenditures in Brazil: a qualitative analysis of the federal budget for the period from
    ," MPRA Paper 47373, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. J. Paul Dunne & Sam Perlo-Freeman, 2003. "The demand for military spending in developing countries: A dynamic panel analysis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 461-474.
  11. Ismael Sanz & Francisco Javier Velázquez, 2002. "Determinants of the Composition of Government Expenditure by Functions," European Economy Group Working Papers 13, European Economy Group.
  12. Ali Hamid E., 2011. "Military Expenditures and Human Development: Guns and Butter Arguments Revisited: A Case Study from Egypt," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 17(1), pages 1-21, September.
  13. Jurgen Brauer, 2002. "Survey and Review of the Defense Economics Literature on Greece and Turkey: What Have We Learned?," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 85-107.
  14. Todd Sandler & James C. Murdoch, 2000. "On sharing NATO defence burdens in the 1990s and beyond," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 21(3), pages 297-327, September.
  15. Bove Vincenzo & Gleditsch Kristian Skrede, 2011. "2010 Lewis Fry Richardson Lifetime Achievement Award: Ron P. Smith and the Economics of War and Peace," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 17(1), pages 1-12, December.

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