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Cost-Benefit Models for Explaining Consumer Choice and Information Seeking Behavior

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  • Brian T. Ratchford

    (State University of New York at Buffalo)

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    Abstract

    While it provides excellent descriptions of behavior, existing consumer research on information seeking and processing largely fails to explain why consumers engage in various types of activities. This paper presents an economic framework for measuring costs/benefits of search behavior which can help to resolve these questions. This work shows how such a framework can lead to testable hypotheses about information seeking, and discusses how operational measures of economic incentives to search can be developed and employed.

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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.28.2.197
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by INFORMS in its journal Management Science.

    Volume (Year): 28 (1982)
    Issue (Month): 2 (February)
    Pages: 197-212

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    Handle: RePEc:inm:ormnsc:v:28:y:1982:i:2:p:197-212

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    Related research

    Keywords: marketing: buyer behavior; search and surveillance; economics;

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    Cited by:
    1. Xin Wang & Alan Montgomery & Kannan Srinivasan, 2008. "When auction meets fixed price: a theoretical and empirical examination of buy-it-now auctions," Quantitative Marketing and Economics, Springer, vol. 6(4), pages 339-370, December.
    2. Assar Lindbeck & Solveig Wikström, 2002. "E-exchange and the Boundary between Households and Organizations," CESifo Working Paper Series 806, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Smith, Gerald E. & Venkatraman, Meera P. & Dholakia, Ruby Roy, 1999. "Diagnosing the search cost effect: Waiting time and the moderating impact of prior category knowledge," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 285-314, June.
    4. DeSarbo, Wayne S. & Choi, Jungwhan, 1998. "A latent structure double hurdle regression model for exploring heterogeneity in consumer search patterns," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 89(1-2), pages 423-455, November.
    5. Hauser, John R. & Urban, Glen L. & Weinberg, Bruce D., 1992. "Time flies when you're having fun : how consumers allocate their time when evaluating products," Working papers 3439-92., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
    6. Lemieux, James & Peterson, Robert A., 2011. "Purchase deadline as a moderator of the effects of price uncertainty on search duration," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 33-44, February.
    7. Antonides, G. & Verhoef, P.C., 2000. "Consumer Perception and Evaluation of Waiting Time," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2000-35-MKT, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus Uni.
    8. Frank J. van Rijnsoever & Carolina Castaldi, 2008. "Knowledge base, information search and intention to adopt innovation," Innovation Studies Utrecht (ISU) working paper series 08-02, Utrecht University, Department of Innovation Studies, revised Feb 2008.

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