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Disentangling The College Wage Premium: Estimating A Model With Endogenous Education Choices

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  • Hanming Fang

Abstract

This article proposes and empirically implements a structural model of education choices and wage determination to quantitatively evaluate the contributions of productivity enhancement and ability signaling in the college wage premium. The model is estimated under various distributional parameterizations using 1990 U.S. Census 5% Public Use Micro Sample. Under these parameterizations, I find that college education enhances attendees' productivity by about 40%, and productivity enhancement accounts for close to two-thirds of the college wage premium. Copyright 2006 by the Economics Department Of The University Of Pennsylvania And Osaka University Institute Of Social And Economic Research Association.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association in its journal International Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 47 (2006)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 1151-1185

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Handle: RePEc:ier:iecrev:v:47:y:2006:i:4:p:1151-1185

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Cited by:
  1. Sergey V. Popov & Dan Bernhardt, 2012. "Fraternities and Labor-Market Outcomes," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(1), pages 116-41, February.
  2. Hornig, Stephan O. & Rottmann, Horst & Wapler, Rüdiger, 2009. "Information asymmetry, education signals and the case of Ethnic and Native Germans," IAB Discussion Paper 200914, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
  3. Alberto Bisin & Andrea Moro & Giorgio Topa, 2011. "The Empirical Content of Models with Multiple Equilibria in Economies with Social Interactions," NBER Working Papers 17196, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Hendel, Igal & Shapiro, Joel & Willen, Paul, 2005. "Educational opportunity and income inequality," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 841-870, June.
  5. Peter Arcidiacono & Patrick Bayer & Aurel Hizmo, 2008. "Beyond Signaling and Human Capital: Education and the Revelation of Ability," NBER Working Papers 13951, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Jang-Ting Guo & Alan Krause, . "Dynamic Nonlinear Income Taxation with Quasi-Hyperbolic Discounting and No Commitment," Discussion Papers 11/16, Department of Economics, University of York.
  7. Dean Corbae' & Tzu-Ying Chen, 2010. "Can Credit Market Signalling Improve Labor Market Outcomes?," 2010 Meeting Papers 685, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  8. Nicola Persico, 2002. "Racial Profiling, Fairness, and Effectiveness of Policing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1472-1497, December.
  9. Bergh, Andreas & Fink, Günther, 2009. "Higher education, elite institutions and inequality," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 376-384, April.
  10. Wang, Le, 2012. "Economic transition and college premium in urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 238-252.
  11. Hornig, Stephan O. & Rottmann, Horst & Wapler, Rüdiger, 2011. "Sorting on the labour market: A literature overview and theoretical framework," OTH im Dialog: Weidener Diskussionspapiere 27, University of Applied Sciences Amberg-Weiden (OTH).
  12. Liu, Liqun & Neilson, William S., 2011. "High scores but low skills," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 507-516, June.
  13. Dong, Baomin & Fu, Shihe & Gong, Jiong & Fan, Hanwen, 2014. "The Lame Drain," MPRA Paper 53825, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  14. Francesc Dilme & Fei Li:, 2012. "Dynamic Education Signaling with Dropout, Second Version," PIER Working Paper Archive 13-048, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 03 Sep 2013.
  15. Chen, M. Keith & Chevalier, Judith A., 2008. "The taste for leisure, career choice, and the returns to education," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 353-356, May.
  16. Hidalgo Cabrillana, Ana, 2009. "Endogenous capital market imperfections, human capital, and intergenerational mobility," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 285-298, November.
  17. Carl Davidson & Nicholas Sly, 2013. "A Simple Model of Globalization, Schooling and Skill Acquisition," CESifo Working Paper Series 4394, CESifo Group Munich.

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