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Simplifying choice through attribute preservation or non-attendance: Implications for willingness to pay

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  • Hensher, David A.
  • Rose, John M.
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    Abstract

    There is a growing interest in seeking out rules that individuals invoke when processing information in choice experiments. A rule that is attracting attention in stated choice studies is the extent to which respondents attend to or ignore one or more attributes in processing the information on offer. A model specification method is implemented in the context of a stated choice data set where car drivers choose between tolled and non-tolled routes. The evidence into a willingness to pay (WTP) for travel time savings is obtained, and contrasted with the results from the traditional full preservation model. The evidence suggests that the WTP is sufficiently different and higher, on average.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1366554508001488
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review.

    Volume (Year): 45 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 4 (July)
    Pages: 583-590

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:transe:v:45:y:2009:i:4:p:583-590

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    Related research

    Keywords: Attribute preservation Non-attendance Information processing Willingness to pay Choice experiments;

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    Citations

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    Cited by:
    1. David Hensher & Andrew Collins & William Greene, 2013. "Accounting for attribute non-attendance and common-metric aggregation in a probabilistic decision process mixed multinomial logit model: a warning on potential confounding," Transportation, Springer, vol. 40(5), pages 1003-1020, September.
    2. Marsh, Dan & Mkwara, Lena Asimenye & Scarpa, Riccardo, 2010. "Does respondent’s perceived knowledge of the status quo affect attribute attendance and WTP in choice experiments? Evidence from the Karapiro Catchment Freshwater streams," 2010 Conference, August 26-27, 2010, Nelson, New Zealand 96809, New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    3. David Hensher & David Layton, 2010. "Parameter transfer of common-metric attributes in choice analysis: implications for willingness to pay," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 473-490, May.
    4. Greiner, Romy & Bliemer, Michiel & Ballweg, Julie, 2014. "Design considerations of a choice experiment to estimate likely participation by north Australian pastoralists in contractual biodiversity conservation," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 10(C), pages 34-45.
    5. Jorge Araña & Carmelo León, 2009. "The Role of Environmental Management in Consumers Preferences for Corporate Social Responsibility," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 44(4), pages 495-506, December.
    6. Mohammed Alemu & Morten Mørkbak & Søren Olsen & Carsten Jensen, 2013. "Attending to the Reasons for Attribute Non-attendance in Choice Experiments," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 54(3), pages 333-359, March.
    7. David Hensher & John Rose & William Greene, 2012. "Inferring attribute non-attendance from stated choice data: implications for willingness to pay estimates and a warning for stated choice experiment design," Transportation, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 235-245, March.
    8. Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl & Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark, 2010. "Preferences for site and environmental functions when selecting forthcoming national parks," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(7), pages 1532-1544, May.
    9. Zander, Kerstin K. & Straton, Anna, 2010. "An economic assessment of the value of tropical river ecosystem services: Heterogeneous preferences among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(12), pages 2417-2426, October.
    10. KESSELS, Roselinde & BRADLEY, Jones & GOOS, Peter, 2012. "A comparison of partial profile designs for discrete choice experiments with an application in software development," Working Papers 2012004, University of Antwerp, Faculty of Applied Economics.
    11. Yoo, James & Ready, Richard C., 2014. "Preference heterogeneity for renewable energy technology," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 101-114.

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