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Culture Clash or Culture Club? National Identity in Britain

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  • Alan Manning
  • Sanchari Roy

Abstract

This article investigates the extent and determinants of British identity among those living in Britain, a source of considerable contemporary angst. We find no evidence for a culture clash in general, and one connected with Muslims in particular. The vast majority of those born in Britain, of whatever ethnicity or religion, think of themselves as British. Newly arrived immigrants almost never think of themselves as British but the longer they remain in the UK, the more likely it is that they do. This process of assimilation is faster for those from poorer and less democratic countries. Copyright � The Author(s). Journal compilation � Royal Economic Society 2010.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Royal Economic Society in its journal The Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 120 (2010)
Issue (Month): 542 (02)
Pages: F72-F100

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Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:120:y:2010:i:542:p:f72-f100

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Cited by:
  1. Battu, Harminder & Seaman, Paul & Zenou, Yves, 2004. "Job Contact Networks and the Ethnic Minorities," Working Paper Series 628, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  2. Georgiadis, Andreas & Manning, Alan, 2013. "One nation under a groove? Understanding national identity," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 166-185.
  3. Mariya Aleksynska & Barry Chiswick, 2013. "The determinants of religiosity among immigrants and the native born in Europe," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 563-598, December.
  4. Joan Costa-i-Font & Frank Cowell, 2012. "Social identity and redistributive preferences: a survey," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 44307, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  5. Andreas Georgiadis & Alan Manning, 2009. "Change and continuity among minority communities in Britain," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 28514, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  6. Hamilton, Alexander & Hudson, J R, 2014. "Bribery and Identification : Evidence from Sudan," Department of Economics Working Papers 39841, University of Bath, Department of Economics.
  7. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00580907 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Johnston, David W. & Lordan, Grace, 2012. "Discrimination makes me sick! An examination of the discrimination–health relationship," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 99-111.
  9. Leonardo Becchetti & Andrew E. Clark & Elena Giachin Ricco, 2011. "The value of diplomacy: Bilateral relations and immigrant well-being," PSE Working Papers halshs-00580907, HAL.
  10. Nandi, Alita & Platt, Lucinda, 2013. "Britishness and identity assimilation among the UK’s minority and majority ethnic groups," Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2013-08, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  11. Aleksynska, Mariya, 2011. "Civic participation of immigrants in Europe: Assimilation, origin, and destination country effects," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 566-585, September.
  12. repec:ese:iserwp:2014-01 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. Gabin Langevin & Pascaline Vincent, 2013. "National Identity and Immigrants’ Assimilation in France," Economics Working Paper Archive (University of Rennes 1 & University of Caen) 201341, Center for Research in Economics and Management (CREM), University of Rennes 1, University of Caen and CNRS.

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