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The Path to Convergence: Intergenerational Occupational Mobility in Britain and the US in Three Eras

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  • Jason Long
  • Joseph Ferrie
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    Abstract

    Late nineteenth-century intergenerational occupational mobility was higher in the US than in Britain. Differences between them in this type of mobility are absent today. Using data on 10,000 US and British father and son pairs followed over two intervals (the 1860s and 1870s, and the 1880s and 1890s), we examine how this convergence occurred. The US remained more mobile then Britain through 1900 but the difference fell over the last two decades of the nineteenth century (as British mobility rose) and was erased by the 1950s (as mobility fell by more in the US than in Britain). Copyright 2007 The Author(s). Journal compilation Royal Economic Society 2007.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Royal Economic Society in its journal The Economic Journal.

    Volume (Year): 117 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 519 (03)
    Pages: C61-C71

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    Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:117:y:2007:i:519:p:c61-c71

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    Cited by:
    1. repec:ese:iserwp:2013-23 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Lee, Chulhee, 2012. "Military service and economic mobility: Evidence from the American civil war," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 367-379.
    3. Sarah Brown & John Sessions & Karl Taylor, 2004. "What Will I Be When I Grow Up? An Analysis of Childhood Expectations and Career Outcomes," Discussion Papers in Economics 05/2, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    4. William Mullins & Antoinette Schoar, 2013. "How do CEOs see their Role? Management Philosophy and Styles in Family and Non-Family Firms," NBER Working Papers 19395, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Necker, Sarah & Voskort, Andrea, 2014. "Intergenerational transmission of risk attitudes – A revealed preference approach," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 66-89.
    6. John Parman, . "Gender and Intergenerational Mobility: Using Health Outcomes to Compare Intergenerational Mobility Across Gender and Over Time," Working Papers 122, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
    7. Jäntti, Markus & Jenkins, Stephen P., 2013. "Income Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 7730, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Alice Kasakoff & Andrew Lawson & Emily Van Meter, 2014. "A Bayesian analysis of the spatial concentration of individual wealth in the US North during the nineteenth century," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(36), pages 1035-1074, April.
    9. Steven Ruggles, 2014. "Big Microdata for Population Research," Demography, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 287-297, February.

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