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Gender Bias, Credit Constraints and Time Allocation in Rural India

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  • Rose, Elaina
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    Abstract

    This paper examines the impact of a child's gender on the time allocation of rural Indian households for the five-year period subsequent to its birth. A theoretical model generates predictions for the effect of the birth of a boy relative to a girl (i.e., the gender shock) on household behaviour when the household is liquidity constrained and when it is not. The results from the empirical analysis are consistent with the case in which poorer households are liquidity constrained and less poor households are not. The interpretation of the finding that women in both groups of households work less subsequent to the birth of a boy relative to a girl differs in these two cases.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Royal Economic Society in its journal The Economic Journal.

    Volume (Year): 110 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 465 (July)
    Pages: 738-58

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    Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:110:y:2000:i:465:p:738-58

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    Cited by:
    1. Mussa, Richard, 2009. "Household economic status, schooling costs, and schooling bias against non-biological children in Malawi," MPRA Paper 15855, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 21 Jun 2009.
    2. Priya BHAGOWALIA & Susan E. CHEN & Gerald SHIVELY, 2007. "Input Choices In Agriculture: Is There A Gender Bias?," Working Papers 07-09, Purdue University, College of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Economics.
    3. Shelly Lundberg & Elaina Rose, 1999. "The Effect of Sons and Daughters on Men's Labor Supply and Wages," Discussion Papers in Economics at the University of Washington 0033, Department of Economics at the University of Washington.
    4. T. Paul Schultz, 2009. "Population and Health Policies," Working Papers 974, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    5. Patrick M. Emerson & Andre Portela Souza, 2002. "Birth Order, Child Labor and School Attendance in Brazil," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0212, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    6. Zimmermann, Laura, 2012. "It's a Boy! Women and Non-Monetary Benefits from a Son in India," IZA Discussion Papers 6847, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Schultz, T. Paul, 2010. "Population and Health Policies," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
    8. Zimmermann, Laura, 2012. "Remember When It Rained: The Elusiveness of Gender Discrimination in Indian School Enrollment," IZA Discussion Papers 6833, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Kelly Jones, 2014. "Growing Up Together: Cohort Composition and Child Investment," Demography, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 229-255, February.
    10. Abhishek Chakravarty, 2012. "Gender-discriminatory premarital investments, fertility preferences and breastfeeding in Egypt," Economics Discussion Papers 723, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
    11. Silvia Helena Barcellos & Leandro Carvalho & Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2010. "Child Gender and Parental Investments in India: Are Boys and Girls Treated Differently?," Working Papers 756, RAND Corporation Publications Department.
    12. Florencia Lopez Boo & Maria E. Canon, 2012. "Richer but more unequal? nutrition and caste gaps," Working Papers 2012-051, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    13. Quy-Toan Do & Tung Duc Phung, 2010. "The Importance of Being Wanted," Working Papers id:2515, eSocialSciences.
    14. Bhalotra, Sonia & Umana-Aponte, Marcela, 2012. "Women.s Labour Supply and Household Insurance in Africa," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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