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Education And Technology Adoption In A Small Open Economy: Theory And Evidence

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  • KUMAR, KRISHNA B.

Abstract

We develop a simple open-economy growth model in which productivity growth and education influence each other, and use it to empirically address issues of causality between them. Technology adoption fostered by human capital and economic openness determines productivity growth; the framework allows us to evaluate whether the effects of these two variables on growth documented in previous cross-country regression studies carry over to a simultaneous system closely allied to a model. This model implies that an increase in openness will stimulate technical change but, for empirically plausible values of the intertemporal elasticity of substitution, it will cause a decrease in the level of education. The empirical analysis specifies productivity growth and human capital as endogenous variables and finds evidence broadly consistent with the theory openness and education stimulate productivity growth, and there is a negative effect of this growth on human capital accumulation.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal Macroeconomic Dynamics.

Volume (Year): 7 (2003)
Issue (Month): 04 (September)
Pages: 586-617

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Handle: RePEc:cup:macdyn:v:7:y:2003:i:04:p:586-617_02

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Cited by:
  1. Cuong Le Van & Manh-Hung Nguyen & Thai Bao Luong, 2006. "New technology, Human Capital and Growth for Developing Countries," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00118979, HAL.
  2. Sequeira, Tiago Neves, 2007. "Transitional Dynamics of an Endogenous Growth Model with an Erosion Effect," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp508, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
  3. Vu, Tam Bang & Hammes, David L. & Im, Eric Iksoon, 2012. "Vocational or university education? A new look at their effects on economic growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(2), pages 426-428.
  4. Silva, André C., 2010. "Managerial ability and capital flows," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1), pages 126-136, September.
  5. Ayse Imrohoroglu & Krishna B. Kumar, 2004. "Intermediation Costs and Capital Flows," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 7(3), pages 586-612, July.
  6. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00118979 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Tiago Sequeira & Elsa Martins, 2008. "Education public financing and economic growth: an endogenous growth model versus evidence," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 361-377, September.
  8. Manuel A. Gómez, 2012. "Equilibrium Dynamics Of An Endogenous Growth Model With An Erosion Effect And Duplication In R&D," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 80(6), pages 700-717, December.
  9. Elizabeth M. Caucutt & Selahattin Imrohoroglu & Krishna B. Kumar, 2003. "Growth and Welfare Analysis of Tax Progressivity in a Heterogeneous-Agent Model," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 6(3), pages 546-577, July.
  10. Tiago Sequeira, 2012. "Facts and distortions in an endogenous growth model with physical capital, human capital and varieties," Portuguese Economic Journal, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 171-188, December.
  11. Elizabeth M. Caucutt & Krishna B. Kumar, 2003. "Education Policies to Revive a Stagnant Economy: The Case of Sub- Saharan Africa," Development and Comp Systems 0304002, EconWPA.
  12. Elisabeth Caucutt & Krishna B. Kumar, 2007. "Education For All: A Welfare-Improving Course for Africa?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(2), pages 294-326, April.
  13. Cuong Le Van & Manh-Hung Nguyen & Thai Bao Luong & Tu Anh Nguyen, 2008. "New Technology, Human Capital and Growth for European Transitional Economies," THEMA Working Papers 2008-07, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
  14. Ayse Imrohoroglu & Krishna B. Kumar, 2003. "Entry Costs, Intermediation, and Capital Flows," Macroeconomics 0304001, EconWPA.

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