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A Compromise Estimate of German Net National Product, 1851 1913, and its Implications for Growth and Business Cycles

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  • BURHOP, CARSTEN
  • WOLFF, GUNTRAM B.

Abstract

We develop a compromise estimate of the German Net National Product for the years 1851 1913 based on four estimates from Hoffmann (1965) and Hoffmann and M ller (1959) by recalculating industrial production, investment, home and foreign capital income. Because differences remain during the early decades, we compute a weighted average compromise series. Economic activity is shown to be higher than the older estimates suggest. The average growth rate is lower. The average business cycle lasted five years, with high volatility in the early decades. The typical Gr nderzeit pattern of boom then prolonged recession after 1873 can not be confirmed.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal The Journal of Economic History.

Volume (Year): 65 (2005)
Issue (Month): 03 (September)
Pages: 613-657

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Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:65:y:2005:i:03:p:613-657_00

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Cited by:
  1. Henrekson, Magnus & Edquist, Harald, 2006. "Technological Breakthroughs and Productivity Growth," Working Paper Series 665, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  2. Lübbers, Thorsten, 2008. "Shareholder value mining: Wealth effects of takeovers in German coal mining, 1896-1913," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 462-476, September.
  3. Carsten Burhop & David Chambers & Brian Cheffins, 2011. "Is Regulation Essential to Stock Market Development? Going Public in London and Berlin, 1900-1913," Cologne Economic History papers 10, University of Cologne, Department of Economic and Business History, revised Mar 2011.
  4. Thorsten Lübbers, 2009. "Is Cartelisation Profitable? A Case Study of the Rhenish Westphalian Coal Syndicate, 1893-1913," Working Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2009_09, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
  5. Uebele, Martin & Pfister, Ulrich & Riedel, Jana, 2012. "Real wages and the origins of modern economic growth in Germany, 16th to 19th centuries," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 62076, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  6. Max-Stephan Schulze, 2005. "An estimate of imperial Austria’s gross domestic fixed capital stock, 1870-1913: methods, sources and results," Economic History Working Papers 22325, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  7. Carsten Burhop & Thorsten Luebbers, 2011. "The design of licensing contracts: Chemicals, Pharmaceuticals, and Electrical Engineering in Imperial Germany," Cologne Economic History papers 11, University of Cologne, Department of Economic and Business History, revised Jun 2011.
  8. Markus Lampe, 2009. "Effects of Bilateralism and the MFN Clause on International Trade – Evidence for the Cobden-Chevalier Network, (1860-1875)," CQE Working Papers 0209, Center for Quantitative Economics (CQE), University of Muenster.
  9. Carsten Burhop & David Chambers & Brian Cheffins, 2011. "Is Regulation Essential to Stock Market Development? Going Public in London and Berlin, 1900-1913," Working Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2011_15, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.

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