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The Intellectual Origins of Modern Economic Growth

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  • MOKYR, JOEL
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    Abstract

    The intellectual origins of the Industrial Revolution are traced back to the Baconian program of the seventeenth century, which aimed at expanding the set of useful knowledge and applying natural philosophy to solve technological problems and bring about economic growth. The eighteenth-century Enlightenment in the West carried out this program through a series of institutional developments that both increased the amount of knowledge and its accessibility to those who could make best use of it. Without the Enlightenment, therefore, an Industrial Revolution could not have transformed itself into the sustained economic growth starting in the early nineteenth century.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal The Journal of Economic History.

    Volume (Year): 65 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 02 (June)
    Pages: 285-351

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    Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:65:y:2005:i:02:p:285-351_00

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    Cited by:
    1. Diego Comin & William Easterly & Erick Gong, 2010. "Was the Wealth of Nations Determined in 1000 BC?," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 65-97, July.
    2. Weiss, Volkmar, 2007. "The Population Cycle Drives Human History - from a Eugenic Phase into a Dysgenic Phase and Eventual Collapse," MPRA Paper 6557, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 22 May 2007.
    3. Bottomley, Sean, 2014. "Patenting in England, Scotland and Ireland during the Industrial Revolution, 1700-1852," IAST Working Papers 14-07, Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse (IAST).
    4. Kevin H. O'Rourke & Ahmed S. Rahman & Alan M. Taylor, 2007. "Trade, Knowledge, and the Industrial Revolution," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp219, IIIS.
    5. Thráinn Eggertsson, 2010. "In the woods: darkness at noon or Sunday in the park with Lin?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 143(3), pages 275-282, June.
    6. Mara P. Squicciarini & Nico Voigtländer, 2014. "Human Capital and Industrialization: Evidence from the Age of Enlightenment," NBER Working Papers 20219, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Gregory Clark & Kevin H. O'Rourke & Alan M. Taylor, 2008. "Made in America? The New World, the Old, and the Industrial Revolution," NBER Working Papers 14077, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Akcomak, Semih & Stoneman, Paul, 2010. "How novel is social capital: Three cases from the British history that reflect social capital," MERIT Working Papers 015, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    9. Kevin O’Rourke & Ahmed Rahman & Alan Taylor, 2013. "Luddites, the industrial revolution, and the demographic transition," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 373-409, December.
    10. Garner, Phillip, 2008. "Productivity revolutions and science driven growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 101(1), pages 24-26, October.
    11. Braggion, F., 2008. "Managers, Firms and (Secret) Social Networks: The Economics of Freemasonry," Discussion Paper 2008-36, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    12. Magnani, Elisabetta, 2009. "How does technological innovation and diffusion affect inter-industry workers' mobility?," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 16-37, March.
    13. Szalavetz, Andrea, 2011. "Innovációvezérelt növekedés?
      [Innovation-driven growth?]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(5), pages 460-476.

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