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Banks and State Public Finance in the New Republic: The United States, 1790–1860

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  • Sylla, Richard
  • Legler, John B.
  • Wallis, John J.
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal The Journal of Economic History.

    Volume (Year): 47 (1987)
    Issue (Month): 02 (June)
    Pages: 391-403

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    Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:47:y:1987:i:02:p:391-403_04

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    Cited by:
    1. Svetlana Andrianova & Panicaos Demetriades & Chenggang Xu, 2008. "Political Economy Origins of Financial Markets in Europe and Asia," WEF Working Papers 0034, ESRC World Economy and Finance Research Programme, Birkbeck, University of London.
    2. Sylla, Richard & Wallis, John Joseph, 1998. "The anatomy of sovereign debt crises: Lessons from the American state defaults of the 1840s," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 267-293, July.
    3. Howard Bodenhorn, 2006. "Bank Chartering and Political Corruption in Antebellum New York. Free Banking as Reform," NBER Chapters, in: Corruption and Reform: Lessons from America's Economic History, pages 231-258 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Michael D. Bordo & Angela Redish & Hugh Rockoff, 2011. "Why didn’t Canada have a banking crisis in 2008 (or in 1930, or 1907, or ...)?," NBER Working Papers 17312, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. John Joseph Wallis & Barry R. Weingast, 2005. "Equilibrium Impotence: Why the States and Not the American National Government Financed Economic Development in the Antebellum Era," NBER Working Papers 11397, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Masami Imai & Peter Hull, 2012. "Does taxation on banks mean taxation on bank-dependent borrowers?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(4), pages 3439-3448.
    7. Stephen Haber & Enrico Perotti, 2008. "The Political Economy of Financial Systems," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 08-045/2, Tinbergen Institute.
    8. Warren E. Weber, 2014. "The Efficiency of Private E-Money-Like Systems: The U.S. Experience with State Bank Notes," Working Papers 14-15, Bank of Canada.
    9. Timothy J. Goodspeed, 2012. "The Incidence of Bank Regulations and Taxes on Wages: Evidence from US States," CESifo Working Paper Series 4026, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. Stephen Haber & Enrico Perotti, 2008. "The Political Economy of Financial Systems," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 08-045/2, Tinbergen Institute.
    11. Peter Hull & Masami Imai, 2011. "Does Taxation on Banks Tax Bank Borrowers? Evidence from the Tokyo Bank Tax Experiment," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2011-005, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.

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