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Notes on the Social Saving Controversy

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  • Fogel, Robert William

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal The Journal of Economic History.

Volume (Year): 39 (1979)
Issue (Month): 01 (March)
Pages: 1-54

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Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:39:y:1979:i:01:p:1-54_09

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Cited by:
  1. Nicholas Crafts, 2003. "Quantifying the contribution of technological change to economic growth in different eras: a review of the evidence," Economic History Working Papers 22350, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  2. McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen, 2009. "Domestic Reshufflings, Such as Transport and Coal, Do Not Explain the Modern World," MPRA Paper 18925, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. repec:cge:warwcg:01 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Isaías N. Chaves & Stanley L. Engerman & James A. Robinson, 2013. "Reinventing the Wheel: The Economic Benefits of Wheeled Transportation in Early British Colonial West Africa," NBER Working Papers 19673, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Brian Mitchell & David Chambers & Nick Crafts, 2011. "How good was the profitability of British railways, 1870–1912?," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 64(3), pages 798-831, 08.
  6. Tim Leunig & Joachim Voth, 2011. "Spinning Welfare: the Gains from Process Innovation in Cotton and Car Production," CEP Discussion Papers dp1050, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  7. Maria Teresa Ramirez, 2000. "Railroads and the Colombian Economy," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0043, Econometric Society.
  8. Tim Leunig, 2005. "Time is money: a re-assessment of the passenger social savings from Victorian British railways," Economic History Working Papers 22551, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  9. Berger, Thor & Enflo, Kerstin, 2014. "Locomotives of Local Growth: The Short- and Long-Term Impact of Railroads in Sweden," Lund Papers in Economic History 132, Department of Economic History, Lund University.
  10. Nicholas Crafts, 2010. "Cliometrics and technological change: a survey," The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(5), pages 1127-1147.
  11. Bruland, Kristine & Smith, Keith, 2013. "Assessing the role of steam power in the first industrial revolution: The early work of Nick von Tunzelmann," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(10), pages 1716-1723.
  12. María Teresa Ramírez, . "The Impact of Transportation Infrastructure on the Colombian Economy," Borradores de Economia 124, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
  13. Rio Lydon, 2012. "The eighth wonder of the world: how might access for vehicles have prevented the economic failure of the Thames Tunnel 1843-1865?," Economic History Working Papers 47804, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  14. Matthias Morys, 2003. "Was the Bundesbank’s credibility undermined during the process of German reunification?," Economic History Working Papers 22355, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  15. Herranz-Loncan, Alfonso, 2011. "The contribution of railways to economic growth in Latin America before 1914: a growth accounting approach," MPRA Paper 33578, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  16. Dave Donaldson & Richard Hornbeck, 2013. "Railroads and American Economic Growth: A “Market Access” Approach," NBER Working Papers 19213, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Nicholas Crafts, 2004. "Social savings as a measure of the contribution of a new technology to economic growth," Economic History Working Papers 22554, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  18. Roger W. Ferguson & William L. Wascher, 2004. "Distinguished Lecture on Economics in Government: Lessons from Past Productivity Booms," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(2), pages 3-28, Spring.

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