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Simulating the Distributional Effects of a Canadian Carbon Tax

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  • Kirk Hamilton
  • Grant Cameron
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    Abstract

    It is estimated that a tax of roughly $102 per ton of carbon is the level necessary to meet the Rio target for carbon emissions. Cost-push simulations show consumers expenditure to be the category of demand most affected by the tax (prices increase by 2.0-2.4 percent), and commercial transportation the most affected production sector (2.2-2.6 percent). Micro-simulations calculate the average incidence of the tax to range from $552 to $657 per family per year, with moderately regressive results: decreases in consumable income for the lowest income quintile are from 1.1 to 1.2 percent higher than for the highest. Low income married couples are the family type most heavily affected by the tax.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Toronto Press in its journal Canadian Public Policy.

    Volume (Year): 20 (1994)
    Issue (Month): 4 (December)
    Pages: 385-399

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    Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:20:y:1994:i:4:p:385-399

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    Cited by:
    1. Sam Meng & Mahinda Siriwardana & Judith McNeill, 2013. "The Environmental and Economic Impact of the Carbon Tax in Australia," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 54(3), pages 313-332, March.
    2. Callan, Tim & Lyons, Sean & Scott, Susan & Tol, Richard S.J. & Verde, Stefano, 2009. "The distributional implications of a carbon tax in Ireland," Energy Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 407-412, February.
    3. Kverndokk, Snorre & Rose , Adam, 2008. "Equity and Justice in Global Warming Policy," Memorandum, Oslo University, Department of Economics 21/2008, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    4. Djoni Hartono & Tony Irawan & Ahmad Komarulzaman, 2014. "Energy Pricing Policies in Indonesia: A Computable General Equilibrium Model," EcoMod2014 7344, EcoMod.
    5. Emmanuel Combet & Frédéric GHERSI & Jean Charles Hourcade & Daniel Théry, 2009. "Need a Carbon Tax be Socially Regressive ? True Challenges and Wrong Debates," CIRED Working Papers hal-00866410, HAL.
    6. James Boyce & Matthew Riddle & Mark D. Brenner, 2005. "A Chinese Sky Trust? Distributional Impacts of Carbon charges and Revenue Recycling in China," Working Papers, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst wp_brenner_riddle_boyce, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    7. Wier, Mette & Birr-Pedersen, Katja & Jacobsen, Henrik Klinge & Klok, Jacob, 2005. "Are CO2 taxes regressive? Evidence from the Danish experience," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 239-251, January.
    8. Brenner, Mark & Riddle, Matthew & Boyce, James K., 2007. "A Chinese sky trust?: Distributional impacts of carbon charges and revenue recycling in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 1771-1784, March.
    9. Tomás J. López-Guzmán Guzmán & Sandra Mª Sánchez Cañizares, 2009. "Fiscalidad autonómica y medio ambiente. Una reflexión en torno al impuesto andaluz que grava la contaminación atmosférica," Revista de Estudios Regionales, Universidades Públicas de Andalucía, Universidades Públicas de Andalucía, vol. 4, pages 351-358.
    10. Emmanuel Combet & Frédéric GHERSI & Jean Charles Hourcade, 2009. "Taxe carbone, une mesure socialement régressive ? Vrais problèmes et faux débats," CIRED Working Papers hal-00866409, HAL.
    11. Hussein, Zekarias & Golub, Alla A. & Hertel, Thomas W., 2012. "Climate Change Mitigation Policies and Global Poverty," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association 124689, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    12. repec:hal:wpaper:hal-00866409 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Speck, Stefan, 1999. "Energy and carbon taxes and their distributional implications," Energy Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 27(11), pages 659-667, October.
    14. Matthew Riddle & James Boyce, 2007. "Cap and Dividend: How to Curb Global Warming while Protecting the Incomes of American Families," Working Papers, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst wp150, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    15. Arief Anshory Yusuf & Budy P. Resosudarmo, 2007. "On the Distributional Effect of Carbon Tax in Developing Countries: The Case of Indonesia," Working Papers in Economics and Development Studies (WoPEDS), Department of Economics, Padjadjaran University 200705, Department of Economics, Padjadjaran University, revised Aug 2007.
    16. repec:hal:wpaper:hal-00866410 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Dissou, Yazid & Siddiqui, Muhammad Shahid, 2014. "Can carbon taxes be progressive?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 88-100.
    18. Oladosu, Gbadebo & Rose, Adam, 2007. "Income distribution impacts of climate change mitigation policy in the Susquehanna River Basin Economy," Energy Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 520-544, May.
    19. Dorothee Boccanfuso & Antonio Estache & Luc Savard, 2011. "The Intra-country Distributional Impact of Policies to Fight Climate Change: A Survey," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(1), pages 97-117.

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