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The Move Toward a Cashless Society: Calculating the Costs and Benefits

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Author Info

  • Garcia-Swartz Daniel D.

    (LECG)

  • Hahn Robert W.

    ()
    (American Enterprise Institute-Brookings Joint Center for Regulatory Studies)

  • Layne-Farrar Anne

    (LECG)

Abstract

While the "cashless society" has not yet fully become a reality, payment choices by consumers and merchants have been moving the U.S. economy in that direction slowly and steadily over the past five decades. In this study, a companion paper to Garcia-Swartz (2006a) in this volume, we lay out the detailed cost and benefit calculations behind our analysis of the steady changes in transaction payment methods.

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File URL: http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/rne.2006.5.2/rne.2006.5.2.1095/rne.2006.5.2.1095.xml?format=INT
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal Review of Network Economics.

Volume (Year): 5 (2006)
Issue (Month): 2 (June)
Pages: 1-30

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Handle: RePEc:bpj:rneart:v:5:y:2006:i:2:n:2

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Web page: http://www.degruyter.com

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References

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  1. Jeffrey M. Lacker, 1993. "Should we subsidize the use of currency?," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Win, pages 47-73.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Hahn, Robert W. & Layne-Farrar, Anne & Swartz, Daniel D. Garcia, 2004. "The Move toward a Cashless Society: A Closer Look at Payment Instrument Economics," Working paper 247, Regulation2point0.
  2. Antoine Martin & Michael Orlando & David Skeie, 2006. "Payment networks in a search model of money," Staff Reports 263, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  3. Segendorf, Björn & Jansson, Thomas, 2012. "The Cost of Consumer Payments in Sweden," Working Paper Series 262, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
  4. Andrew Ching & Fumiko Hayashi, 2006. "Payment card rewards programs and consumer payment choice," Payments System Research Working Paper PSR WP 06-02, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
  5. Verdier, Marianne, 2012. "Interchange fees and inefficiencies in the substitution between debit cards and cash," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 682-696.
  6. Wilko Bolt & Nicole Jonker & Corry van Renselaar, 2008. "Incentives at the counter: An empirical analysis of surcharging card payment and payment behaviour in the Netherlands," DNB Working Papers 196, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  7. Ron Borzekowski & Elizabeth K. Kiser, 2006. "The choice at the checkout: quantifying demand across payment instruments," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2006-17, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  8. Fumiko Hayashi, 2008. "The economics of payment card fee structure: what is the optimal balance between merchant fee and payment card rewards?," Research Working Paper RWP 08-06, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
  9. Nicole Jonker, 2013. "Social costs of POS payments in the Netherlands 2002-2012: Efficiency gains from increased debit card usage," DNB Occasional Studies 1102, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  10. Fumiko Hayashi, 2008. "The economics of payment card fee structure: policy considerations of payment card rewards," Research Working Paper RWP 08-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
  11. Kahn, Charles M. & Roberds, William, 2009. "Why pay? An introduction to payments economics," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 1-23, January.
  12. Bergman, Mats & Guibourg, Gabriela & Segendorf, Björn, 2007. "The Costs of Paying – Private and Social Costs of Cash and Card Payments," Working Paper Series 212, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
  13. Fumiko Hayashi, 2008. "The economics of payment card fee structure: what drives payment card rewards?," Research Working Paper RWP 08-07, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

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