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Recruitment Methods and Vacancy Duration

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Author Info

  • Roper, Stephen

Abstract

Data from a national (U.K.) sample of job vacancies was used to explore the factors determining job vacancy duration. Banded durational dat a necessitated the use of regression techniques which allow for a qua litative dependent variable. The chosen approach was a polychotamous ordered probit model. The choice of recruitment methods by firms was found to be highly significant. Between recruitment methods the stand ard relativities emerged; informal methods fill vacancies fastest-new spaper advertisements are slowest. Copyright 1988 by Scottish Economic Society.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Scottish Economic Society in its journal Scottish Journal of Political Economy.

Volume (Year): 35 (1988)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 51-64

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Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:35:y:1988:i:1:p:51-64

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Cited by:
  1. Michele Pellizzari, 2004. "Do friends and relatives really help in getting a good job?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19980, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. James W. Albrecht & Jan C. van Ours, 2006. "Using Employer Hiring Behavior to Test the Educational Signaling Hypothesis," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 108(3), pages 361-372, October.
  3. Manning, Alan, 2000. " Pretty Vacant: Recruitment in Low-Wage Labour Markets," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 62(0), pages 747-70, Special I.
  4. Osorno Del Rosal, Mª P. & Navarro Ibáñez, M., 2000. "Actividad y desempleo femenino: un modelo bivariante," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 14, pages 117-136, Abril.
  5. René Böheim & Mark P Taylor, 2002. "Job search methods, intensity and success in Britain in the 1990s," Economics working papers 2002-06, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  6. Adams, John & Greig, Malcolm & McQuaid, Ronald W., 1999. "Mismatch and unemployment in local labour markets," ERSA conference papers ersa99pa027, European Regional Science Association.
  7. Zhang, Xuelin & Morissette, Rene, 2001. "Quelles entreprises ont des taux de vacance eleves au Canada?," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 2001176f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
  8. Egbert, Henrik & Fischer, Gundula & Bredl, Sebastian, 2009. "Advertisements or friends? Formal and informal recruitment methods in Tanzania," Discussion Papers 46, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Center for international Development and Environmental Research (ZEU).
  9. Jos van Ommeren & Giovanni Russo, 2004. "Sequential or Non-sequential Recruitment?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 04-109/3, Tinbergen Institute, revised 15 Sep 2008.
  10. Weber, Andrea & Mahringer, Helmut, 2006. "Choice and Success of Job Search Methods," IZA Discussion Papers 1939, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Zhang, Xuelin & Morissette, Rene, 2001. "Which Firms Have High Job Vacancy Rates in Canada?," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2001176e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  12. Osberg, Lars, 1995. "The Missing Link - Data on the Demand Side of Labour Markets," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1995077e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  13. Markus Heckmann & Susanne Noll & Martina Rebien, 2013. "Stellenbesetzungen mit Hindernissen: Bestimmungsfaktoren für den Suchverlauf," AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv, Springer, vol. 6(3), pages 105-131, March.
  14. Ours, J.C., 1989. "An empirical analysis of employers' search," Serie Research Memoranda 0021, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
  15. Teyssiere, Gilles, 1995. "Matching processes in the labour market an econometric study," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(4), pages 421-435, December.

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