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Determinants and Consequences of Promotions in Britain

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  • Francesconi, Marco

Abstract

Using longitudinal data from the British Household Panel Survey 1991-95, this study finds that 9 percent of all workers report a promotion at their firm in any given year and that promotions account for approximately 36 percent of total job turnover, with small gender differences. Workers who are married, have full-time jobs, work overtime, are employed in large establishments and high-level occupations, and come from more recent cohorts have significantly higher chances of promotion. In addition, promotions lead to higher wage growth and increases in job satisfaction. Copyright 2001 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Department of Economics, University of Oxford in its journal Oxford Bulletin of Economics & Statistics.

Volume (Year): 63 (2001)
Issue (Month): 3 (July)
Pages: 279-310

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Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:63:y:2001:i:3:p:279-310

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Cited by:
  1. Kunze, Astrid, 2013. "Gender differences in career progression: Does the effect of children capture low work effort?," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79705, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  2. Gregg, Paul & Grout, Paul A. & Ratcliffe, Anita & Smith, Sarah & Windmeijer, Frank, 2011. "How important is pro-social behaviour in the delivery of public services?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7-8), pages 758-766, August.
  3. Markus Pannenberg, 2002. "Long-Term Effects of Unpaid Overtime," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 293, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  4. Sjögren Lindquist, Gabriella, 2010. "Tournaments and unfair treatment," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 670-682, December.
  5. repec:ese:iserwp:2007-20 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Booth, Alison L. & van Ours, Jan C., 2007. "Job Satisfaction and Family Happiness: The Part-time Work Puzzle," IZA Discussion Papers 3020, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. repec:ese:iserwp:2009-11 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Melero Martín, Eduardo, 2004. "Evidence on Training and Career Paths: Human Capital, Information and Incentives," IZA Discussion Papers 1377, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. David W. Johnston & Wang-Sheng Lee, 2013. "Extra Status and Extra Stress: Are Promotions Good for Us?," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 66(1), pages 32-54, January.
  10. David Campbell & Francis Green, 2002. "The Long Term Pay-Off From Working Longer Hours," Studies in Economics 0205, Department of Economics, University of Kent.
  11. Michael Bognanno & Eduardo Melero, 2012. "Promotion Signals, Age and Education," DETU Working Papers 1205, Department of Economics, Temple University.
  12. Booth, A.L. & Ours, J.C. van, 2007. "Job Satisfaction And Family Happiness: The Part-Time Work Problem," Discussion Paper 2007-69, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  13. Vincent Mok & Godfrey Yeung, 2005. "Employee motivation, external orientation and the technical efficiency of foreign-financed firms in China: a stochastic frontier analysis," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(3), pages 175-190.
  14. Machado, C. Sofia & Portela, Miguel, 2013. "Age and Opportunities for Promotion," IZA Discussion Papers 7784, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  15. Pannenberg, Markus, 2002. "Long-Term Effects of Unpaid Overtime: Evidence for West Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 614, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  16. Chris Doucouliagos & Phillip Hone & Mehmet Ulubasoglu, 2006. "Discrimination, Peformance and Career Progression in Australian Public Sector Labor Markets," Economics Series 2006_07, Deakin University, Faculty of Business and Law, School of Accounting, Economics and Finance.
  17. Booth, Alison L. & Francesconi, Marco & Frank, Jeff, 2003. "A sticky floors model of promotion, pay, and gender," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 295-322, April.

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