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Health Behavior in Developing Countries

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Author Info

  • Pascaline Dupas

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, and NBER, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138)

Abstract

The disease burden in low-income countries is extremely high. Malaria, respiratory infections, diarrhea, AIDS, and other diseases are estimated to kill more than 15 million people each year, most of them children. Yet the great majority of these diseases can be prevented or treated. This article reviews microeconomic studies of health-seeking behavior in low-income countries. Factors examined include information, peers, liquidity constraints, and nonrational preferences, such as present bias. I then discuss the implications for policy, including the scope for mandates, subsidies, and incentives.

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File URL: http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-economics-111809-125029
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Annual Reviews in its journal Annual Review of Economics.

Volume (Year): 3 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (09)
Pages: 425-449

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Handle: RePEc:anr:reveco:v:3:y:2011:p:425-449

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Related research

Keywords: adoption; prevention; market failures; subsidy; incentive;

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Cited by:
  1. Massimiliano Bratti & Mendola, M., 2013. "GINI DP 63: Parental Health and Child Schooling!," GINI Discussion Papers 63, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
  2. Michael Greenstone & B. Kelsey Jack, 2013. "Envirodevonomics: A Research Agenda for a Young Field," NBER Working Papers 19426, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Jennifer M. Meredith & Jonathan Robinson & Sarah Walker & Bruce Wydick, 2013. "Keeping the Doctor Away: Experimental Evidence on Investment in Preventative Health Products," NBER Working Papers 19312, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Andrew Dillon & Jed Friedman & Pieter Serneels, 2014. "Health information, treatment, and worker productivity: Experimental evidence from malaria testing and treatment among Nigerian sugarcane cutters," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-13, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  5. Gianmarco León & Edward Miguel, 2013. "Transportation Choices and the Value of Statistical Life," Working Papers 716, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  6. Hanna, Rema & Duflo, Esther & Greenstone, Michael, 2012. "Up in Smoke: The Influence of Household Behavior on the Long-Run Impact of Improved Cooking Stoves," Working Paper Series rwp12-015, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  7. Iajya, Victor & Lacetera, Nicola & Macis, Mario & Slonim, Robert, 2013. "The effects of information, social and financial incentives on voluntary undirected blood donations: Evidence from a field experiment in Argentina," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 214-223.
  8. Victor Iajya & Nicola Lacetera & Mario Macis & Robert Slonim, 2012. "The Effects of Information, Social and Economic Incentives on Voluntary Undirected Blood Donations: Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial in Argentina," NBER Working Papers 18630, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Sylvia, Sean & Luo, Renfu & Zhang, Linxiu & Shi, Yaojiang & Medina, Alexis & Rozelle, Scott, 2013. "Do you get what you pay for with school-based health programs? Evidence from a child nutrition experiment in rural China," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 1-12.
  10. Hoffmann, Vivian & Gatobu, Ken Mwithirwa, 2014. "Growing their own: Unobservable quality and the value of self-provisioning," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 168-178.
  11. Jessica Cohen & Pascaline Dupas & Simone G. Schaner, 2012. "Price Subsidies, Diagnostic Tests, and Targeting of Malaria Treatment: Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial," NBER Working Papers 17943, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Wüst, Miriam, 2012. "Early interventions and infant health: Evidence from the Danish home visiting program," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 484-495.

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