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What Have We Learned from 20 Years of Stated Preference Research in Less-Developed Countries?

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  • Dale Whittington

    ()
    (Department of Environmental Sciences & Engineering and Department of City & Regional Planning, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599
    2Innovation, Management, and Policy Division, The Manchester Business School, Manchester M15 6PB, United Kingdom)

Abstract

Over the past two decades, hundreds of stated preference studies have been conducted in less-developed countries. This article examines what has been learned on the methodological front from stated preference research, and it summarizes the empirical evidence from stated preference studies about household preferences in less-developed countries. The main conclusion is that households' willingness to pay for a wide range of goods and services offered to respondents in stated preference scenarios is low, in both relative and absolute terms and in comparison to the costs of service provision. This article discusses why this finding is important for development professionals. The article also identifies what is missing from the literature on stated preference studies in less-developed countries.

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File URL: http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.resource.012809.103908
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Annual Reviews in its journal Annual Review of Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 2 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (October)
Pages: 209-236

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Handle: RePEc:anr:reseco:v:2:y:2010:p:209-236

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Related research

Keywords: contingent valuation; willingness to pay; demand estimation; developing countries;

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Cited by:
  1. Whittington, Dale & Jeuland, Marc & Barker, Kate & Yuen, Yvonne, 2012. "Setting Priorities, Targeting Subsidies among Water, Sanitation, and Preventive Health Interventions in Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1546-1568.

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