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The Effects of Information on Residential Demand for Electricity

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  • Isamu Matsukawa

Abstract

This paper measures the effects of information on residential demand for electricity, using data from a Japanese experiment. In the experiment, households had a continuous-display, electricity use monitoring device installed at their residence. The monitor was designed so that each consumer could easily look at graphs and tables associated with the consumer s own usage of electricity at any time during the experiment. The panel data were used to estimate a random effects model of electricity and count data models of monitor usage. The results indicate that monitor usage contributed to energy conservation.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by International Association for Energy Economics in its journal The Energy Journal.

Volume (Year): Volume 25 (2004)
Issue (Month): Number 1 ()
Pages: 1-18

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Handle: RePEc:aen:journl:2004v25-01-a01

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Cited by:
  1. Schleich, Joachim & Klobasa, Marian & Gölz, Sebastian & Brunner, Marc, 2013. "Effects of feedback on residential electricity demand—Findings from a field trial in Austria," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1097-1106.
  2. Kazutoshi Tsuda & Keishiro Hara & Michinori Uwasu, 2013. "Prospects and Challenges for Disseminating Life Cycle Thinking towards Environmental Conscious Behaviors in Daily Lives," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(1), pages 123-135, January.
  3. Carsten Lynge Jensen & Lars Gårn Hansen & Troels Fjordbak & Erik Gudbjerg, 2011. "The effect of providing free autopoweroff plugs to households on electricity consumption - A field experiment," IFRO Working Paper 2011/10, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.
  4. Gilbert E. Metcalf, 2006. "Energy Conservation in the United States: Understanding its Role in Climate Policy," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0609, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  5. DeCarolis, Joseph F. & Keith, David W., 2006. "The economics of large-scale wind power in a carbon constrained world," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 395-410, March.
  6. John Lynham & Kohei Nitta & Tatsuyoshi Saijo & Nori Tarui, 2014. "Why does real-time information reduce energy consumption?," Working Papers 201419, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
  7. Anna Kowalska-Pyzalska & Katarzyna Maciejowska & Katarzyna Sznajd-Weron & Rafal Weron, 2013. "Going green: Agent-based modeling of the diffusion of dynamic electricity tariffs," HSC Research Reports HSC/13/05, Hugo Steinhaus Center, Wroclaw University of Technology.
  8. Sovacool, Benjamin K., 2009. "The importance of comprehensiveness in renewable electricity and energy-efficiency policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1529-1541, April.
  9. Mizobuchi, Kenichi & Takeuchi, Kenji, 2013. "The influences of financial and non-financial factors on energy-saving behaviour: A field experiment in Japan," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 775-787.
  10. Isamu Matsukawa, 2005. "The Benefits of Information on the Efficient Usage of Consumer Durables," Others 0501005, EconWPA.
  11. S. Gaudin, 2006. "Effect of price information on residential water demand," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(4), pages 383-393.
  12. Schleich, Joachim & Klobasa, Marian & Brunner, Marc & Gölz, Sebastian & Götz, Konrad, 2011. "Smart metering in Germany and Austria: Results of providing feedback information in a field trial," Working Papers "Sustainability and Innovation" S6/2011, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).

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